Other Voices: Gerald Manley Hopkins

In classical and Christian schools we seek rigorous academics and a robust Christian worldview, but these are not the only necessary ingredients for instruction that ennobles the mind and educates the whole person. In any discipline, there are “other voices” that speak to our hearts and minds. In this workshop we will explore ways that poetry, literature, art, music, and rambles in the wilderness can add layers of depth to our classroom discussions about science.

John Mays

After receiving his BS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University, John D. Mays spent 14 years in industry in engineering and engineering management in the areas of electrical, controls and telecommunications systems. Vocationally drawn toward the field of education, John acquired an MEd in Secondary Education from the University of Houston in 1989, and subsequently completed 36 hours of graduate study in Physics at Texas A&M. Shortly a er joining the faculty at Regents School of Austin in 1999, John began work on an MLA at St. Edward’s University, which he completed in 2003. John served as the Math-Science Department Chair at Regents School from 2001 until 2009 when he became Director of the Laser Optics Lab at Regents. He founded Novare Science and Math in 2009, and is the author of numerous student science texts and teacher resources. Now working full time as writer, publisher and consultant, John continues to teach students part time at the Laser Optics Lab at Regents.

Christian Dante: Salvation by Grace Alone in the Comedy

In Paradiso 12 Dante says God rescued Christendom “through grace alone” (per sola grazia). Guido da Montefeltro (inferno 27) and his son Buonconte (Purgatorio 5) exemplify God’s grace, a theme that permeates the Comedy.

Christian Kopff

Christian Kopff was educated at St. Paul’s School (Garden City NY), Haverford College and UNC, Chapel Hill (Ph. D., Classics). He has taught at the University of Colorado, Boulder, since 1973, and most currently as Associate Director of the Honors Program. He has edited a critical edition of the Greek text of Euripides’ Bacchae (Teubner, 1982) and published over 100 articles and reviews on scholarly, pedagogical and popular topics. A Fellow of the American Academy in Rome, he has received research grants from the NEH and CU’s Committee on Research. The Devil Knows Latin: Why America Need the Classical Tradition (ISIBooks, 1999) is widely cited by Classical Christian educators. He translated Josef Pieper, Tradition: Concept and Claim (ISIBooks, 2008; St. Augustine’s, 2010) and contributed the Introduction to Herbert Jordan’s translation of Homer’s Iliad (Oklahoma UP, 2008).

Integrating Curriculum with Rhetoric

If we want to integrate the curriculum (and we do), we need a principle of harmony that is both big enough to include everything and practical enough to prepare for everything. [Kern] shows how classical rhetoric is the necessary practical tool to integrate the curriculum.

Andrew Kern

Andrew Kern is the Founder and President of CiRCE Institute. He has also helped found Providence Academy, Ambrose School, Great Ideas Academy and Regents Schools of the Carolinas. Andrew is the co-author of Classical Education: The Movement Sweeping America, The Lost Tools of Writing and The CiRCE Guide to Reading. Andrew is also a consultant and founded the CiRCE apprenticeship.

Lesson Planning for Optimal Learning

The most effective teaching and the most meaningful student learning happen when teachers design the right learning targets and use them along with their students to aim for and assess understanding. This practical seminar will be helpful for elementary and secondary teachers as they strive to be more intentional in their instruction and assessment, with the ultimate goal of increased student achievement.

Lori Jill Keeler

Lori Jill Keeler has served for the past 10 years as the Loner School Principal at the Westminster School in Birmingham, AL. She earned a B.A. in Secondary Education and English Literature, and a M.Ed. in Integrated Curriculum and Instruction from Covenant College. She served as the educational expert on the founding Board of Directors for Evangel Classical Christian School in Helena, Alabama, has wri en second through six grade Bible curriculum, and has been a guest speaker on creating a culture of grace at several classical schools in the Southeast. Lori Jill and her husband Scott have two sons.

The Next Clash of Absolutes: Religious Liberty and LGBR Sexual Liberty

Emboldened by the Supreme Court’s majority opinions in Romer, Lawrence, Windsor, and the pending Obergefell marriage cases, judges, government of officials, and LGBT activists are seeking to redefine marriage, sexuality, and gender identity in law and public policy. How do these redefinitions intersect with the free exercise of religion under the First Amendment, Religious Freedom Restoration Act, Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act, and related state laws and policies?

Matthew Kacsmaryk

Matthew Kacsmaryk is Deputy General Counsel and Managing Director of Direct Litigation, Research, and Education. Mr. Kacsmaryk served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Northern District of Texas from 2008 through 2013. Assigned to the Appellate Division, he represented the United States government in over 75 criminal appeals led in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, including several cases of first impression and numerous cases requiring oral argument. Mr. Kacsmaryk also served on two Criminal Division trial teams that prosecuted high profile, violent defendants and was responsible for all appellate litigation arising under the First Amendment, Sixth Amendment, and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. While at the United States Attorney’s Office, he served as a CLE instructor, an appellate liaison to the Criminal Division, and an Adjunct Lecturer on Free Speech and the First Amendment at Southern Methodist University, Meadows School of the Arts. In October 2013, he was awarded the A orney General’s Award for Excellence in Furthering the Interests of U.S. National Security. Prior to his work as a prosecutor, Mr. Kacsmaryk was an associate at the Dallas office of Baker Bo s L.L.P., where he focused on commercial, constitutional, and intellectual property litigation, representing national, regional, and local clients. In 2005, he received the rm’s Opus Justitiae Award for Outstanding Commitment to Pro Bono Work. Mr. Kacsmaryk received his J.D. from the University of Texas, graduating with Honors. While at the University of Texas, he was awarded the Dean’s Achievement Award in Constitutional Law II and Telecommunications Law, served as an Executive Editor of the Texas Review of Law & Politics, and was a member of The Federalist Society, Christian Legal Society, and Bible Study Fellowship. Mr. Kacsmaryk received his B.A. summa cum laude from Abilene Christian University, where he was a Trustee Scholar and a member of the Jack Pope Fellows Program.

Framing Science Discussions

Christians may disagree about the details of ‘how’ and ‘when,’ but for our discussions we agree on this foundational doctrine: 1) Encourage a respectful discussion within the body of Christ and with those outside Christianity 2) Recognize that both strict naturalists who dismiss supernaturalism and strict adherents to certain secondary doctrines within Christianity can squelch dialogue through dogmatism and unkindness 3) Both ‘sides’ should take responsibility by refraining from demeaning other viewpoints 4) Acknowledge the tension that arises when our understanding of science and our understanding of faith seem to be in conflict 5) Suggest that our confusion may stem from either an incomplete view of Scripture or an incomplete view of science 6) Encourage students to pray for wisdom, seek the Scriptures, and dialogue with other believers, especially their parents.

Allison Jackson

Allison is honored to be able to serve on the Regent School of Austin faculty as a School of Logic science teacher. She loves students, she enjoys science, and she is passionate about the discipleship-centered approach of classical, Christian education. Allison earned a biology degree with a chemistry minor from the University fo North Texas and worked in labs on and o campus. Allison felt called to teaching, and her career began in public highschool, where she taught biology. Since then, she has taught in a variety fo se ings, including summer science camps for grammar and logic students, where they sketched wild owers, raised bu er y caterpillars and made messes while learning kitchen sink chemistry. She also tutored students and parents in a weekly class for classical homeschoolers. Recently, Allison had the privilege of helping to launch a classical school in Bulverde, Texas, where she also taught 6-8th grade students. When Allison is not teaching, you can probably nd her cheering for her sons on the football or baseball fields or riding bikes on the trails of Austin with her husband.

Socratic Dialogue Demonstration

Grant Horner

Professor Grant Horner’s academic specialty is the literature, theology and philosophy of the Renaissance and Reformation, with primary concentration in Milton, Shakespeare, Erasmus, Luther, Calvin and late sixteenth and seventeenth century intellectual and cultural history. His research and writing has focused on Christian Humanism in the Reformation, particularly the complex relationship between developing Reformed thought and Classical Graeco-Roman pagan mythology and philosophy. At Duke University he was taught and mentored by Stanley Fish, America’s leading literary theorist. He has worked on the citation of classical Greek and Latin authorities by Renaissance writers, published on theology and the arts, and is actively researching and writing a full-length work on John Milton and John Calvin. His book Meaning at the Movies on lm and theology (Crossway, 2010) was an Amazon bestseller and nominated for Book of the Year in Christianity and Culture by the Book Retailers Association.

Why Before How: Making a Math Transition

Whether you are implementing Singapore Math or are simply looking to rev up the math culture in your school, this session is for you. Changing the way math is taught requires more than a change of textbooks. A successful transition requires thoughtful navigation through a constellation of considerations, from the scripts that guide your teachers’ instructional choices to the nature of your questioning. We have successfully moved to a liberal arts augmented Singapore Math program across the past three years. Come learn from our successes and our failures, and enter the conversation about how to move from good to great.

Chris Hall

Chris Hall earned a BA in Philosophy from Ge ysburg College and an MAT in Elementary Education from Towson University. His naturalist pedigree starts far earlier than his college days: roving far and wide through the local streams and fields on his bike at a time when such things were not yet frowned upon by community associations, earning Eagle Scout, training in tracking, and logging years of outdoor time as a backpacker and ancestral skills practitioner. Before serving as Lower School Academic Dean at the Covenant School in Charlottesville, VA, Chris was a PK-8 Science department chair, a teacher of Conceptual Physics, and a wide-ranging classroom teacher in elementary and middle schools. He currently lives o the beaten path in central VA on a homesteaded microfarm with his wife, Catherine, and three sons.

Creation, Design, and Evolution

Are students and parents in your school asking about creation and evolution? Students are growing up in a culture full of heated battles between young earth creationism and atheistic evolution. Yet Christians today are discussing many other options, including old earth creationism, intelligent design, and evolutionary creationism. Come for an overview of the key scientific evidence in God’s creation from astronomy, geology, paleontology, and genetics, and how it all intersects with biblical faith and Christian worldviews.

Deborah Haarsma

Deborah Haarsma serves as the President of BioLogos, a position she has held since January 2013. Previously, she served as professor and chair in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Gifted in interpreting complex scientific topics for lay audiences, Dr. Haarsma often speaks to churches, colleges, and schools about the relationships between science and Christian faith. She is author (along with her husband Loren Haarsma) of Origins: Christian Perspectives on Creation, Evolution, and Intelligent Design (2011, 2007), a book presenting the agreements and disagreements of Christians regarding the history of life and the universe. Many congregations, Christian high schools, and Christian colleges use the book as a guide for navigating Christian debates over creation and evolution.

Common Core, AdvancED, and the Changes in the Works

There’s much in the news about Common Core– less about AdvancED. Put together, these two developments represent what may turn out to be, arguably, the biggest educational change in the past century. As classical Christian schools, we need to understand the ideas behind these organizations so that we can look toward the changes that may come in the future. In this session, we will look at regional accreditation as a model, understand the AdvancED in uence, and look at how the combination of AdvancED and Common Core will likely impact the nation’s schools— public, charter, private, and classical Christian. We will look at ways to prepare now for inevitable changes that will impact even non-AdvancED, non-Common Core schools as a result of market and political forces. As these two forces in education— one specifying what should be taught and the other enforcing it— become more “baked in” to k-12 schools, colleges, and standardized testing, we need to be prepared.

David Goodwin

David Goodwin is currently the President of the Association of Classical Christian Schools. Previously, he served for 10 years as Headmaster, and 20 years on the board of The Ambrose School in Boise Idaho. During his time at Ambrose, his work in gaining state recognition for athletic purposes brought him into the world of regional accreditation. He and his wife, Stormy, live in Boise with their children Elise (15), Alex (14), and Graham (9). They are members and worship at All Saints Presbyterian Church (PCA).