Speaker Bios & Breakout Session Descriptions

Aaron Ames

I teach Rhetoric, Logic, and Speech at Trinity Christian Academy in Lexington, Kentucky. I am a graduate of Asbury Theological Seminary, where I earned an M.A. in Theological Studies with an emphasis in Philosophy, as well as an M.A. in Biblical Studies, with emphases in New Testament and Greek. And I also have an undergraduate degree in Letters and Classics from the University of Oklahoma. My publications have been featured in The Imaginative Conservative and Circe Institute.

Storytelling and the Formation of Souls
Alexander the Great considered it his most prized possession; Hitler entertained it as the means to persuasion and power; and Jesus deemed it worthy of the secrets of the Kingdom of God. From the fables of Aesop to the parables of Jesus, from the dramas of Shakespeare to the television sitcom, one of the most universal threads running through the history of humanity is our obsession with story. But why are stories so captivating? Neuroscience tells us that our memories are made for them; biology, that our bodies are stimulated by them; psychology, that our brains crave them; and theology, that our identity is found in them. As one of the leading scholars of cognitive psychology Carl Schank noted, stories are the very measure by which we “interpret reality” and “understand who we are”. That is, stories are not only the stuff of soul-making but also the stuff of culture-making. Yet, with the average American spending upwards to 84 hours a week in front of a screen, the crucial question becomes: What narrative is most informing our lens of reality? If the way to the heart is through story, then, as educators, we must learn not merely to saturate our students with Christian principles and information but especially to offer them recurring glimpses of Gospel narrative. In short, if classical Christian education is in the business of making souls, then we must also be in the business of storytelling.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | Capitol F

Janet Andreasen

Janet B. Andreasen, PhD., is an associate lecturer of mathematics education at the University of Central Florida (UCF). She is the coordinator of secondary education and works with prospective and practicing mathematics teachers at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Dr. Andreasen’s research interests include examining mathematical knowledge for teaching and using technology to foster student learning of mathematical concepts. Prior to joining the faculty at UCF, Dr. Andreasen was a high school mathematics teacher. Dr. Andreasen has published books, book chapters, and articles in state and national publications as well as professional presentations throughout the United States. She is a member of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, and the Florida Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Dr. Andreasen received a bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Miami (FL) and both a master’s degree in Mathematics Education and a Ph.D. in Education, Mathematics Education from the University of Central Florida. Her dissertation focused upon the ways prospective elementary school teachers come to understand whole number concepts and operations in meaningful ways for teaching through the use of classroom norms and explanations and justifications in a mathematics course for teachers.

Conceptually-based upper school mathematics curriculum: Lessons learned from transition
Two years ago, our school transitioned to a conceptually-based, problem-solving focused mathematics curriculum for upper grades. We implemented Math in Focus for lower grades 8 years prior. This curriculum uses collaboration to foster learning and focuses on students making sense of mathematics for themselves. We will share lessons learned from the process including how parents responded, implementation challenges and obstacles, and success stories. Come learn from our experiences and see how you might make a similar transition within your school.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Barton

Michael Attaway

Michael Attaway, a native of the Dallas area, started his trumpet studies at the age of eleven. Since then, he has performed with some of the world’s finest musicians including Doc Severinson, members of The Juilliard School faculty, Amy Grant, Michael W Smith, Kenny G, Mannheim Steamroller, and many others. Michael currently mentors around forty trumpet students in the Prosper High School area and regularly places students in the TMEA 6A High School All Region and All State ensembles. In addition to trumpet teaching and performing, Michael is an adjunct faculty member at the Northeast campus of Tarrant County College where he teaches courses in music fundamentals and history, and he holds a position as a music teacher in the Logic School at the Covenant School in Dallas. He is the current third trumpet with the Richardson Symphony Orchestra and can be seen performing with professional ensembles around the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Demystifying Classical Music Curriculum
Most parents agree that they would love for their children to be trained in music and to be familiar with the great musical works from the past. However, it is easy to be lost when trying to create a rich music curriculum that encompasses children at all ages. Because of influences of public school programs and also popular perceptions about the “extracurricular” nature of music, the study of music (as well as the other fine arts) can easily be pushed aside in favor of more familiar subjects.

One of the views that makes Christianity (and the classical education system) different from the secular world is that the cosmos is artistic in creation rather than scientific. Everything around us is a symbol and reflection of God’s goodness in the world. The fine arts serve to give children an opportunity to gaze upon the true and the beautiful in the world, and it is vital that students make the connection between art and the beauty of God. For this reason, music is absolutely essential to the education of a child and needs to remain in the forefront of school curriculum.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | Bonnell

Peter Baur

Peter Baur has been involved in independent education for nearly 40 years and has held roles in several environments, including start-up Classical Christian schools and “elite” private schools with over 150 years of history. Peter has served in nearly every capacity, including PR/Marketing, curriculum development, head of school, development/fundraising, special events, college guidance, admission, advisory, teaching and coaching. In addition, Peter has led schools and churches in strategic planning, has presented at Circe, ACCS and SCL, and been a featured speaker at schools around the nation. Peter is known for his ability to articulate Classical Christian education in a simple, practical manner. Peter is the only SCL Fellow elected prior to becoming a head of school.

Transforming Teaching – Seeing your Students as Image Bearers
After hearing this presentation, a veteran teacher of 30+ years commented that it had a more impact on how she viewed her role as a teacher than anything she had previously heard. This is the power of seeing your students as fellow image bearers – a profound understanding of the opportunities you have on a daily basis, to speak into the lives of your students their unique image bearing. What does it mean to see your students as unique image bearers? How might that understanding change the way you see them, teach them, and inspire them? Through personal story, movie clips, and deep insight, this workshop will move you and transform your teaching.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Capitol A-E

Matt Bianco

Matt Bianco is the Director of Consulting and Integrated Resources for the CiRCE Institute, where he also serves as a mentor in the CiRCE apprenticeship program. A homeschooling father of three, he has already graduated two sons. The eldest son attends St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, and his second son attends Belmont Abbey College in Charlotte, North Carolina. His youngest, a daughter, is a high school senior. He is married to his altogether lovely, high school sweetheart, Patty. He is the author of Letters to My Sons: A Humane Vision for Human Relationships.

Teach Writing Slowly
Rhetoric is the art of decision making in community. As a liberating art, many smaller skills culminate in this faculty of truth perception. Teachers often cultivate this art through writing. While early training in writing sometimes focuses on the arrangement and style, the discovery of an argument is saved for older students. How can our students slow down to think before they write? Writing is like a craft that demands attention and consistency, much like learning to play the piano or shoot a bow. The final artifact is infused by the initial inventory of ideas. Classical rhetoric offers the canon of invention, and teachers can utilize these tools to guide classroom discussions, to launch written responses, and to pursue unidentified truths. By using these invention tools in all three of these classroom areas, students will have thoughtful responses modeled for them throughout each day.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Creekside I

Chad Borgestad

Chad Borgestad, Consultant, has over 25 years of experience developing leaders and teams, and training individuals to reach their full potential. He has overseen the startup of four non-profits, raising millions of dollars using the Taking Donors Seriously® framework. Chad has also served as a campus minister at Lutheran Church of Hope, the largest ELCA church in the US. Prior to that, he spent 4 years coaching executives to become principled leaders through individual and team coaching, and spent 20 years with Young Life, serving as an Area Director and Associate Regional Director.

Chad earned a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Sociology from the University of Minnesota before pursuing studies at Fuller Theological Seminary.  He lives in Des Moines, Iowa with his wife of 24 years. They have 3 sons and a daughter-in-law. In his spare time, he enjoys working out, running, biking, or reading a good book.  You may also find him on the lake fishing with his sons, hiking 14’ers in Colorado, or coaching soccer.

How to Develop and Grow Your Annual Fund
Many schools’ fundraising efforts involve a series of events that require a lot of effort relative to the funds they generate. Other schools raise money throughout the year for specific projects or needs but would be better off with a single, comprehensive annual fund.

If you’d like to build a sustainable and predictable annual fund, come learn a more strategic and relational approach that minimizes fatigue and maximizes results. Time will be available to discuss attendees’ specific questions.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Capitol H

Are You Ready for a Capital Campaign?
The Classical Christian Education movement is thriving, and many growing schools are ready to go to the next level by expanding their facilities or funding key initiatives. Join us to learn when it’s appropriate to launch a capital campaign and the key factors that will allow you to meet or exceed your goal. Time will be available to discuss attendees’ specific questions.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Capitol H

Stephanie Boss

Stephanie Boss teaches fifth grade at Covenant Classical School in Fort Worth, Texas. She has taught fifth grade for fourteen years, twelve of which have been in classical Christian education. She received a B.A. in Psychology from Louisiana Tech University and an M.A. in Religious Education with a Childhood Education concentration from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. She has a strong love of literature and enjoys sharing this love with her students. She and her husband, Rob, have two grown daughters both of whom graduated from Covenant.

Jonathan Edwards as Teacher: Affecting Children’s Hearts and Minds
Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758), the great Colonial American pastor and theologian, was also a master teacher. While his primary focus was as congregational pastor and “awakener” of men’s souls, he also cared for the hearts, minds, and souls of young people. The same intensity with which he famously sought to inquire into the state of one’s spiritual conversion, he fought to aid in the educational growth of children. Edwards’ telos was that of “informing of the child’s understanding, influencing his heart, and directing its practice.”

Edwards received a typical eighteenth-century education, but the way in which he interacted with his own children and his students, both English and Indian, was of a different nature. Far from the rote-only education he received, Edwards recognized that children needed to have a full grasp of what they were learning. He employed various methods to ensure understanding.

This workshop will explore the facets of Jonathan Edwards as teacher: his influences, pedagogies, and practices. The specific techniques and habits engaged by Edwards will be viewed, as well as, comparisons made to similar current methods in classical education, especially in the area of reading comprehension. We will learn lessons from Edwards as teacher that can be employed to engage the affections of the whole child.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Capitol G

Liz Caddow

After receiving a Bachelor of Science in Business, Liz Caddow turned to education, earning her Master’s Degree in Education and a History credential from the University of Southern California. She taught in the California public school system for 8 years before founding Trinity Classical Academy. Her passion and leadership have helped Trinity to become one of the fastest growing classical, Christian schools in America, having grown from 28 students in grades K-2 in 2001 to its present enrollment of 565 students in grades TK-12. Liz continues to serve as the Head of School at Trinity.

Starting and growing Classical Christian School
You will hear from three founding heads of schools from three locations, NYC, San Diego and Waco Texas. Collectively these three ladies have over 50 years of experiences running the schools. They will share why they started the school, the challenges of running the school as well as being female HOS/leaders and moms. The format will be a panel discussion style with plenty of times for Q/A.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | sideYard

Kevin Clark

Dr. Kevin Clark serves as Academic Dean of The Geneva School, where he has been a member of the rhetoric faculty for 14 years. Dr. Clark is a founding fellow of SCL’s Alcuin Fellowship and speaks regularly at SCL and Alcuin retreats and conferences.

Conceptually-based upper school mathematics curriculum: Lessons learned from transition
Two years ago, our school transitioned to a conceptually-based, problem-solving focused mathematics curriculum for upper grades. We implemented Math in Focus for lower grades 8 years prior. This curriculum uses collaboration to foster learning and focuses on students making sense of mathematics for themselves. We will share lessons learned from the process including how parents responded, implementation challenges and obstacles, and success stories. Come learn from our experiences and see how you might make a similar transition within your school.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Barton

Leslie Collins

Leslie and her husband, Dave have been working in classical and Christian education since 1995. Leslie was the founding headmistress of Rockbridge Academy in Millersville, Maryland and was privileged to briefly serve in Kailua, Hawaii as Trinity Christian School transitioned to a classical model. She is currently the Head of School at Covenant Academy in Cypress, Texas . Leslie and Dave have four children, the youngest of whom is entering his senior year. Leslie holds a Master of Arts in Biblical Counseling from The Master’s University and a Bachelor of Science in Special Education from the University of Maryland.

How to Support Students with Learning Differences so that Everyone Benefits
This workshop will present practical ways that schools can and should support student with learning differences in their rigorous and classical Christian classrooms. Principles for considering what, how, when, and why to intervene and support students will be shared as attendees present problems and find solutions together.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Bonnell

Eric Cook

Eric Cook is from Lexington, Kentucky, but worked in schools in Ohio and Virginia before joining Covenant Classical School in 2009. Eric earned a bachelor’s degree in Secondary Social Studies Education from Transylvania University, and a master’s degree in Instructional Leadership from Northern Kentucky University. He has taught history, political science, psychology and philosophy in public schools, and served as an assistant principal for several years. In 2006, Eric felt called to join the classical Christian school movement and became the Middle and Upper School Head at Faith Christian School in Roanoke, Virginia. In addition to his leadership roles, Eric taught apologetics, theology, philosophy of religion, and served as thesis director.

Lessons Learned: 10 Years as a Head of School
After being a Head of School for 10 years at Covenant Classical School and transitioning through various stages of institutional development, there is a lifetime of leadership lessons to be learned and shared. This session will provide some principled and practical lessons from facing a myriad of challenges, making a lot of mistakes, watching vision come into reality, and seeing the faithfulness of God. At Covenant, we experienced 107% enrollment growth, added 40 employees, expanded to 54 acres, built a leadership team, and raised millions of dollars. Whether you are a new Head of School, a seasoned veteran, an aspiring Head, or a board member, this session can provide some perspective on the challenges and rewards of being a Head of School and growing a mature classical Christian school.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Creekside II

Martin Cothran

Martin Cothran is editor of the Classical Teacher magazine, a quarterly periodical for parents and professional educators published by Memoria Press. He is also director of the Classical Latin School Association and editor of its Exordium blog on classical Christian education. He is the author of several widely used educational textbooks, including Traditional Logic, Books I and II, Material Logic: A Course on How to Think, Classical Rhetoric: A Study of Aristotle’s Principles of Persuasion, and Lingua Biblica: Old Testament Stories in Latin. He lives with his wife in Danville, Kentucky.

The Siren Song of Education Technology
Education technology is increasingly seen as a panacea for educational improvement. But while there is a certainly a role for technology in learning, it must necessarily be a limited one. Learn the three primary uses of educational technology and which is the most problematic. Learn what current research says about the role of technology in academic achievement, and the consequences of too much screen time. Learn what ancient thinkers had to say about modern education technology (and they did have something to say)? Learn how to prevent a tool from becoming a tyrant.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | sideYARD

David Diener

Dr. David Diener began his formal post-secondary education at Wheaton College where he graduated Summa Cum Laude with a BA in Philosophy and Ancient Languages. After putting his philosophical training to work by building custom cabinets and doing high-end finish carpentry for an Amish company, he moved with his wife to Bogotá, Colombia, where they served as missionaries for three years at a Christian international school. He then attended graduate school at Indiana University where he earned an MA in Philosophy, an MS in History and Philosophy of Education, and a dual PhD in Philosophy and Philosophy of Education. He has taught at The Stony Brook School and Taylor University and has served as Head of Upper Schools at Covenant Classical School in Fort Worth, TX, and Head of School at Grace Academy in Georgetown, TX. He currently works at Hillsdale College where he is the Headmaster of Hillsdale Academy and a Lecturing Professor of Education. He also is an Alcuin Fellow, serves on the Board of Directors for the Society for Classical Learning and the Board of Academic Advisors for the Classical Learning Test, and offers consulting services through Classical Academic Press. He is the author of Plato: The Great Philosopher-Educator and serves as the series editor for Classical Academic Press’ series Giants in the History of Education. The Dieners have four wonderful children and are passionate about classical Christian education.

Education as the Cultivation of Love
What is education? Fundamentally it is not the transference of knowledge, or the development of skill sets, or academic preparation for the next stage of schooling. Fundamentally education is the formation of loves. Its primary task is to cultivate an ordo amoris, an ordering of love, that corresponds to reality and will enable students to live lives of virtue. Drawing on thinkers from Plato and St. Augustine to Josef Pieper and C. S. Lewis, this seminar examines the cultivation of well-ordered loves as the central goal of education and questions how this conception of education should affect what we do in the classroom and how we measure the “success” of the education we provide.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Capitol A-E

Jim Dolas

Jim Dolas is in his fourth year of teaching Middle School at Heritage Preparatory School in Atlanta, GA. Prior to falling into teaching science and logic, he spent a decade working at a variety of software engineering jobs before taking a few years “off” as a full-time dad. He holds computer and electrical engineering degrees from Purdue University and Georgia Tech, but that doesn’t stop him from enjoying a rich reading diet of Tolkien, Lewis, and the frequent epic poem. Jim started his teaching career with a class in Earth science, but, because nature abhors a vacuum, he has branched out to cover life science, physical science, and logic as well.

More Than Just Facts: Liturgy, Logic, and Literature in the Middle School Science Curriculum
Our national culture is conflicted when it comes to science. Many see science as the final arbiter of truth, a discipline elevated almost to the level of deity. Others see science as the great deceiver and enemy of the Christian faith. Still others see science as too difficult to understand. How can we offer students a broader vision of the sciences as one (but not the only) valid and useful way of pursuing knowledge about general revelation? What are the logical implications of Newton’s Laws of Motion? How does plate tectonics tell students about the righteousness of God? What can The Rime of the Ancient Mariner show students about ocean currents? Or what can The Hobbit teach about forest biomes or volcanoes? What does The Magician’s Nephew offer as a critique of experimental science? How can we build a science curriculum that engages not only the students’ minds, but also their imaginations and wills? Join us for a conversation on interdisciplinary integration in the middle school science curriculum.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Bickler

Tina Dube

Cristina Dube is in her 6th year as the grammar school mathematics specialist at the Geneva School of Boerne. She holds a Masters of Science degree in Education and has been involved in mathematics education for over 20 years. Prior to working at Geneva, she spent 14 years as an assessment specialist writing textbooks and tests. She has a passion for mathematics education, classical education, and connecting mathematics to other disciplines. She is a currently working on a doctoral degree in Curriculum and Instruction at Liberty University.

Mens et Manus: Why Integration of Biblical Principles, Mathematics, and Science Matters
When we use our minds and our hands we glorify God (Mens et Manus). This session will address the compartmentalization of grammar school subjects by introducing math and science lessons that develop virtuous traits in students such as curiosity, tenacity, and fair-mindedness. This session will include ideas for holding students accountable for learned information. Fourth and fifth grade mathematics and science teachers and teacher leaders will be equipped with purposeful lessons integrating these content areas and a flowchart to help make curricular decisions at their own schools. Research-based learning theories will be cited for all lessons. Examples include How Far Apart are the Planets? And, Can we Turn a Paperclip into a Magnet?

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Capitol G

Charles Evans

Chuck Evans has been a practitioner and proponent of classical Christian schooling since he became the founding head of Faith Christian School in Roanoke, VA in 1996. As a consultant and interim executive since 2006, Chuck has assisted dozens of classical schools in various aspects of development, from start-up to program expansion to board and leadership coaching to strategic and financial planning. He was involved in the original leadership of SCL and co-founded the Council on Educational Standards and Accountability (CESA). He is an annual presenter at the Van Lunen Center for Christian School Management’s Fellows Program, and he teaches each summer in the graduate program for Independent School Leadership at Vanderbilt University. Chuck and his wife Julie live in Austin. They are blessed with seven children, three dogs, two cats, and a rabbit. Really.

Knocking Down Hurdles: Understanding why being a school board member is so tough and what to do about it
Many a parent has been elected to their school’s board, excited about the opportunities to support the mission, exchange ideas with the executive leadership, and instigate growth and improvement. And many a parent board member has found doing these noble things to be exceedingly difficult, if not seemingly impossible. Responding to a set of trends detected among schools with which BetterSchools engages–difficulty recruiting board members, high rates of board member turnover, poor morale within boards–this workshop identifies a handful of common realities affecting the performance of many leadership teams. Before a board ever convenes, hurdles exist which, if not recognized and factored for, inhibit governing wisdom, organizational effectiveness, and the board’s reputation with its constituents. We can’t prevent the hurdles from existing, but understanding our problems is the first step to remedying them.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Capitol H

Your Board Is A Bad Board, and It Might Be Your Fault: How Heads of School Build Cooperative, Productive, Long-lasting Successful Boards
Let’s face it. School boards get a lot of blame and not much credit. Career school professionals reflexively criticize their and others’ boards for a wide range of dysfunction. Over-engaged and meddling. Under-engaged and passive. Reactionary and impulsive. Slow acting and overly cautious. Think they know too much. They don’t know enough. Working from the insight that harmonious leadership requires certain types of competency on both sides of the ledger–boards and heads–this workshop explores the ways in which successful heads of school lead with their own wisdom and execution to strengthen the boards under whose authority they serve. It’s not about following a list of hard and fast rules. It is much more complex, but, executed well, better for the school and very personally satisfying.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Capitol H

Aaron Fudge

Aaron Fudge serves as the Dean of the Logic School, the Chair of the Language Department, and as a member of the Upper School faculty at Trinity Classical Academy in Valencia, California. He has been a part of the Trinity faculty since 2013 and has taught 7th grade Latin, 8th grade Bible and History, and Honors Greek. Before coming to Trinity, he taught ESL for four years and served as both a youth pastor and college pastor. He and his wife, Elisabeth, have three children, and all five can be found on Trinity’s campus daily. He holds a B.S. in Biblical Studies from Biola University, an M.Div. with focus on exegetical studies from Multnomah Seminary, and a graduate certificate in Classical Christian Studies from New Saint Andrews College.

What does it mean to teach Latin, Greek, and Spanish classically?
In classical schools, Latin is a given: it is the language of the classics. Could you even be a classical school without Latin? However, this assumption of Latin has been a double-edged sword. While it has ensured the revival of Latin teaching, this very given-ness of Latin has meant that we have not had to fight the same fight of recovery that many of the liberal arts have: we have not had to fight for and justify teaching Latin like we have had to do with Euclid, the Great Books, or the progymnasmata. With these, we have had to show that the modern tools are inadequate and that the classical tools are better suited to our purpose. The fight for Latin (and Greek and Spanish) has been different, and it has left us ill-suited to address the question of what it means to teach a foreign language classically. This seminar will begin to address this question and will offer a defense of modern foreign languages—like Spanish—in our curriculum and schools.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Bonnell

Nathan George

Mr. Nate George brings a diverse background and a passion for integrating a biblical worldview to his vocation as a teacher. He earned a Bachelor of Social Work from James Madison University, after which he worked in the field of community mental health with adults experiencing mental illness. The Lord then led him to complete an Masters of Divinity at Covenant Theological Seminary. Following seminary, Nate taught at a Christian school in St. Louis for 7 years, where he also developed Bible curriculum and fostered the integration of a biblical worldview across academic disciplines. He loves to draw on his social work and theology background while teaching, striving to shepherd students and continually point them to Jesus. He currently teaches Bible and Humanities at Veritas School in Richmond, VA. Nate and his wife have three children and are active members at a vibrant urban church.

Creative Biblical Applications Across the Curriculum
All Classical Christian teachers know that, in order for our students to grow in their abilities to apply Scripture to all of life, they need specific models demonstrating the relevance of the Bible to all areas of the curriculum. The question is: How do we infuse the Bible into our various disciplines in accurate and memorable ways? This seminar seeks to equip teachers with interpretive skills, categories, and creative inspiration to integrate Scripture with all our subjects. Such integration requires a two-way relationship: a broader understanding of how to faithfully apply the Bible in different contexts and a willingness to bring other academic knowledge and skills to bear on our reading of the Bible. By elaborating fruitful avenues of integration and exploring specific examples of it, this session will aid teachers at all levels as they train students to fully embrace a Biblical vision for life.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Capitol F

Harlan Gilliam

I began my lifelong learning in April of 1959. I grew up in Alpine, which is in the Big Bend country of Texas, surrounded by God’s glorious handiwork. I attended Alpine public school and 2 years at Sul Ross State University where I studied music theory and composition. I moved to Austin in1979 to try my skills in the music scene. I have worked as a tile setter, a fence builder, a chef, a musician, a nurseryman, an organic farmer, and a worship leader. I have worked at Regents School of Austin for 13 years as the Science and Nature Center Instructor. I am a voracious reader. My goal is that my students would come to appreciate and be awed by the creation and, in the process, develop a deep and lasting relationship with the Creator.

Leveraging the Power of Curiosity
A famous quote by Charlotte Mason states that “Self-education is the only possible education. The rest is mere veneer laid on the surface of a child’s nature.” This thought, coupled with a recent study of “the Lost Tools of Learning” has led to a reevaluation of my goals in lesson planning and the way I structure my class time. My primary interest is now to stimulate the curiosity of my students and set the table in a way that causes them to desire to know.

In this workshop I will share some thoughts on the nature of curiosity and imagination and some of the tools and methods that are helping students to invest their attention and embrace the work of learning. Loving God with heart, soul, mind, and strength and unpacking what it means to be made in His image are important foundations for healthy classrooms. Unlocking and training curiosity and imagination can be successful when approached intentionally.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Capitol F

Jessica Gombert

Jessica Gombert is in her 14th year as the grammar school headmaster at the Geneva School of Boerne. She holds a MA in Education and has been involved in many aspects of education for over 28 years. Teaching experiences include special education, kindergarten, adult classes for Region 20 Alternative Certification program and student teacher supervision at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She has a passion for encouraging students and teachers to become live long learners and for classical and Christian education. She teaches reading in Lusaka, Zambia in the summers and is currently writing children’s readers to supplement Geneva’s phonics curriculum.

The How of Reading Instruction in a Classical Education: The importance of a Systematic Approach to Early Literacy and Reading Achievement
Teacher preparation and knowledge are fundamental to reading achievement. In this session we will discuss why a systematic phonetic approach to reading instruction is classical, brain-based and effective. Understanding how the brain functions during the reading process and being knowledgeable of best practices is necessary for effective reading instruction. We will address the obstacles that get in the way of the reading process and how to come alongside struggling readers. Practical strategies for providing this necessary support in the Grammar School classroom will be shared. Participants will leave knowing how to apply their knowledge of reading development into effective instructional practices.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Capitol G

Tim Griffith

Tim Griffith is a fellow of classical languages at New Saint Andrews College, where he oversees the Latin program, directs the national Phaedrus Latin Composition Contest, and translates sixteenth-century Latin theological texts for Wenden House. He has dedicated the last 15 years to Latin pedagogy, drawing heavily on the work of the great Latin educators of history such as Erasmus, Comenius, W.H.D. Rouse, and Hans Ørberg. He is also the founder of Picta Dicta, an online learning platform specifically designed to assist parents and teachers with the kind of difficult subjects studied in a Classical and Christian Education.

Teaching Latin That Good Old Way But in the Twenty-First Century
It may seem impractical to spend valuable class time learning to write or speak in a dead language . As almost everyone capable of using Latin is now dead, even those who see the value of learning the language at all usually only see the value of learning to read it. But composing Latin, whether aloud or on paper, has been proven for centuries to be an excellent way for students to learn to read it better. This workshop will demonstrate how teachers can teach Latin the old and proven way—through composition and oral composition—while using powerful tools from the 21st century.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Bonnell

Gary Hartenburg

Dr. Gary Hartenburg earned his PhD from the University of California, where he studied philosophy and wrote his dissertation on ancient Greek philosophy. He has been the director of the HBU Honors College since 2013. The Honors College is HBU’s campus-wide honors program that educates its students in the liberal arts through intensive, socratic discussion of great books, dynamic lectures, and personalized writing instruction. Dr. Hartenburg also teaches philosophy at both the undergraduate and graduate levels at HBU. He has spoken at a number of professional philosophy conferences as well as conferences for classical educators and has published articles on ancient philosophy and philosophy of religion. He is currently working on a book on Aristotle’s philosophy of education.

Teaching Logic Dialectically
In themselves, none of the stages of the trivium are more difficult to teach than the others, and each presents its own challenges and opportunities. This workshop will focus on the particular difficulties of teaching logic and how these can be addressed by the teacher’s proper understanding of the unique features of students in the dialectical stage of education. In particular, the teacher must understand that inquiry governed by logic is both rule-bound and open-ended and that both the rules and the freedom of logic must be properly communicated to the student. The crucial mistake to avoid in teaching logic is to emphasize the rules of logic at the expense of the open-ended nature of inquiry that logic is designed to aid. Drawing on the works of Plato and Aristotle, this workshop will review the nature and purpose of logic, both in terms of the subject matter of logic itself as well as the attitude with which teachers must approach students who are in the logic stage of the trivium.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Barton

Jenni Helj

Mrs. Jenni Helj graduated from California State University, Long Beach with a BA in Liberal Studies/Speech Communication and holds a MA in Educational Administration from Concordia University, Irvine. Mrs. Helj has been involved with classical Christian education for 15 years as both a Grammar School teacher and administrator. She is currently in her seventh year at The Cambridge School, San Diego, as the Grammar School principal where she has the privilege of working with students, teachers and parents to further the mission of the school in the lives of the Grammar School students.

Love and Logic overview
Looking for some practical strategies to use in the classroom to help students become more responsible, not only for their academic work, but also for solving conflicts with classmates? Ever have trouble coming up with consequences for student misbehavior on the spot? Are younger parents asking for help in training their children? Do you want faculty to come to school refreshed each day instead of burnt out with chronic discipline problems or classroom management challenges? These are questions we have faced at our school and have found helpful answers in Love and Logic parenting materials and teacher training materials. While not all of the strategies in this curriculum are appropriate for a classical Christian school setting, many of them have been helpful in training our faculty, and students, and providing a common language for students, parents, and faculty alike.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Capitol G

Rim Hinckley

Messiah College – B.A. in Mathematics
Graduate studies in Mathematics and Education from Millersville University and Boston College
Founding Head of School, The Geneva School of Manhattan (est1996)
Prior to starting The Geneva School of Manhattan, Rim Hinckley taught mathematics for 12 years. Along with other Christian believers, she began planning for a classical Christian school in Manhattan in 1995. After a year of planning, praying, pursuing real estate leads, and completing city requirements, Geneva School opened in September 1996 with twenty-two students in three grades. After several years serving as the founder and Head of School, Ms. Hinckley stepped down as full-time headmaster to spend time with her young family. She served on the Board of Trustees for the School until 2011, when she again resumed Head of School responsibilities. Under her leadership, the School has grown to 280 students and two campuses. Ms. Hinckley also serves on the boards of PAVE Academy and Messiah College and has previously served on the board of Hope for New York. She was Teaching Leader for Bible Study Fellowship International from 1996 to 2000. She is a board member of SCL. She and her husband Carter Hinckley have two sons, C.J. and Charlie (‘17and ‘19).

Starting and growing Classical Christian School
You will hear from three founding heads of schools from three locations, NYC, San Diego and Waco Texas. Collectively these three ladies have over 50 years of experiences running the schools. They will share why they started the school, the challenges of running the school as well as being female HOS/leaders and moms. The format will be a panel discussion style with plenty of times for Q/A.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | sideYard

Ann Maura Hinton

Ann Maura Hinton is a graduate of the University of Tennessee earning an B.S degree and M.S Ed in Special Education. She has over thirty years experience teaching a wide variety of children with learning differences in a multiple different academic settings. She has served as the director of Empower Ministries, a non profit ministry that seeks to build bridges from frustration to hope by equipping, strengthening and shepherding children with learning differences academically, relationally and emotionally. She has been certified in cognitive developmental brain training and worked for the last ten years equipping families with the tools needed to increase cognitive development. She co directs a therapeutic camp for vulnerable children called Camp Empower.

Serving Students with Learning Differences
This workshop will provide insight into developing, establishing, and implementing support programs that answer the questions many schools have about serving children with learning differences. This is a program that will work with schools that have limited resources for extra program and limited knowledge of children with mild to moderate learning differences.

Participants will gain a better understanding of how learning to teach children with learning differences can improve your school’s approach to classical education.
Participants will gain a better understanding of how serving a wider spectrum of children deepens community.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Bonnell

Jonathan Horner

Mr. Horner received his Bachelor of Science in History from Appalachian State University and a Masters in Christian Ethics from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been at Trinity Academy since 2008. His time includes teaching in the High School Humanities and Religious Studies departments. Asked to lead the Student Culture in 2013, he founded the House System in 2014, and co-leads the Honor Council.

No Child Left Unknown: Building a Thriving House system
If you’re looking for a thriving student culture, where students feel a sense of belonging and purpose that leads to flourishing, consider starting a House System. Alasdair MacIntyre says in After Virtue, “the best type of human life, is lived by those engaged in constructing and sustaining forms of community directed towards the shared achievement of those common goods without which the ultimate human good cannot be achieved.” It is not common interest, ability, age, or intellect that we use to filter the students into Houses. An intentional approach to sorting students across those categories helps our House System function as the best place for students to flourish.

Engaging students in the process of developing the structure is essential to having cultural buy-in in the initiation of the system. We can show you how Trinity has brought student leaders into the decision making that led to, and continues to run the House System. Every year provides a chance for reflection and refinement. Every crop of leaders offers a fresh perspective on still developing traditions. We will explain the mechanics of starting a House System, and the weekly task of maintaining a thriving House System for a flourishing student culture.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Capitol F

Jane Houchin

Mrs. Houchin has her Bachelor of Science from NC State and a Masters in Education from Clemson University. Jane has taught at Trinity Academy of Raleigh since the school began in 1995. After years of service as a Chemistry teacher and Student Care Director, Jane transitioned into the role of Upper School Head in 2016.

No Child Left Unknown: Building a Thriving House system
If you’re looking for a thriving student culture, where students feel a sense of belonging and purpose that leads to flourishing, consider starting a House System. Alasdair MacIntyre says in After Virtue, “the best type of human life, is lived by those engaged in constructing and sustaining forms of community directed towards the shared achievement of those common goods without which the ultimate human good cannot be achieved.” It is not common interest, ability, age, or intellect that we use to filter the students into Houses. An intentional approach to sorting students across those categories helps our House System function as the best place for students to flourish.

Engaging students in the process of developing the structure is essential to having cultural buy-in in the initiation of the system. We can show you how Trinity has brought student leaders into the decision making that led to, and continues to run the House System. Every year provides a chance for reflection and refinement. Every crop of leaders offers a fresh perspective on still developing traditions. We will explain the mechanics of starting a House System, and the weekly task of maintaining a thriving House System for a flourishing student culture.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Capitol F

Christopher Hoyt

Christopher Hoyt currently teaches high school humanities and choir at Good Shepherd [classical Christian] School in Tyler, of which he is an alumnus. Mr. Hoyt has also worked as a Latin and music teacher for Plano Christian Academy in Plano, Texas.

Mr. Hoyt has the advantage of experiencing school worship from several different vantage points: as a student growing up in a classical Christian school, as a teacher responsible for leading worship at a a non-denominational classical school, and as a teacher helping to lead in worship at a parochial classical school.

School Worship for Spiritual Formation
Many of our schools already incorporate some kind of prayer assembly or chapel service into their week. But we often struggle with the form of that service: how should chapel time be ordered if we are trying to shape the souls of the students and faculty? Who should lead it? Students? Faculty? A rotation of local pastors? How much Scripture, teaching, prayer, or singing should it include? How often should we do it? Should the form be regular, or should we change it frequently for the sake of variety? All of these questions demonstrate our quandary: we want chapel to be more than just a rubber stamp of Christianity, but we don’t know what it should look like in practice.

This workshop will take participants through a model of school worship that yields long-term spiritual formation and works within the framework of the grammar, logic, and rhetoric stages. It is a model that has been tried and proved by the centuries, and has its roots in both the ancient monastic communities and the great academies of England. It is active, participatory, regular, reverent, and full of Scripture. It provides students with a rich diet of Bible readings, historical prayers, and classic hymns of the faith. The presenter, Mr. Christopher Hoyt, has experienced school chapels from a number of different vantage points: as a student, as a teacher at a non-denominational classical Christian school, and as a teacher at a parochial school.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Creekside I

Allison Jackson

“By faith we understand that the universe was formed at God’s command, so that what is seen was not made from what was visible,” (Hebrews 11:3).
I am honored to be a part of the Regents community as a School of Logic science teacher and the seventh grade dean! I love middle school students, I’m passionate about the wonders of the natural world, and I am ever so grateful for the discipleship-centered approach of classical, Christian education.
As a pre-med major I earned a biology degree and a chemistry minor from the University of North Texas and worked in labs on and off campus. Since then I have taught public high school Pre-AP Biology, summer science and nature study camps for little ones, and everything in between. Highlights include weekly classes for classical home schoolers, establishing a school garden, and founding a classical, Christian private school with several other families. Over the years I have developed science and nature study curriculum for K-12 and love the opportunity to integrate subjects as a classical educator. My teaching at Regents includes time in our garden and singing silly science songs with students as often as possible.

Refreshing Your Classical Toolkit: Engaging Your Students Through a Variety of Instructional Strategies
Academic rigor need not lead to rigor mortis! Are you stuck in the lecture rut? Could you use a few fresh ideas Children (and adults!) benefit from a variety of instructional strategies and learning methods. Students can think deeply and stay engaged when they have the opportunity to play with ideas, to move to learn, and to articulate their understanding along the way. This practical workshop will equip you with creative, classical tools to take back to your classroom. Veteran teachers:Please join us to share your ideas and refresh your toolkit. New to classical education or new to teaching? Here we go!

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Creekside I

Nathan Jordan

During my time at Vanderbilt University as an undergraduate, I felt the pull of the Holy Spirit towards being in education. However, in my mind I could not let my parents down because they had not sent me to a wonderful private high school and a fine university to make a teacher’s salary. After attending a month of law school at the University of Georgia, I fled to the corporate world and became one of the youngest, successful pharmaceutical representatives for a major international corporation. After five years of dreading Monday mornings and much soul searching, I finally launched my career in education as a middle school geography teacher and a varsity basketball coach at my alma mater in Atlanta. I had another stint in the corporate world between 2008 and 2010 which were some of the darkest years of my life. Praying to God that if He would open a path back into educating young people, I would stay for the rest of my career. Thankfully, a part time middle school history position opened up in midtown Atlanta and God called me to my current place of employment. I have worked as an educator, coach, campus minister, and Dean of Students in Christian schools for 11 years, with the last 9 spent in a Classical Christian environment at Heritage Preparatory School in Atlanta, Georgia. I recently became the Headmaster at Covenant Christian School in Smyrna, GA. I am also the current history teacher of my daughter, Sarah Kate who is one of my sixth grade students.

Middle School Matters: A Guide For Parents, Teachers, and Administrators for a Flourishing Transition Into Adulthood
In all of my years in education so many fear driven, emotional conversations happen each year with my students, their parents, and my coworkers. Anyone who lives through it, knows adolescence to be one of the most difficult and challenging seasons of our lives. It takes a special calling to be educators during this transition for all humans from childhood to adulthood. Teachers, administrators, parents and coaches must be sensitive in holding to a strong sense of Faith in response to the tremendous swings in emotions and hormones! Those serving families of this age group must also grow in empathy and love for parents who are tasked with guiding children who have changed from sweet, innocent kids to moody teenagers who can be disrespectful, defiant, and even depressed.

The focus of this workshop will be on how we can all best partner together as like minded Classical Christian educators and families in our endeavor to shape the whole person who will be an instrument of the Holy Spirit. We will review best practices and habits for how to help Middle School Students and parents have the most flourishing experience possible during these formative years. These practices will range from Spiritual disciplines to after school habits and strategies in attacking homework. We will also delve into the mind of an adolescent to understand how we can meet their need for becoming their own person in Christ.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Capitol F

Russ Kapusinski

Russ Kapusinski serves as the Assistant Head of School at The Cambridge School (TCS) in San Diego, California. Russ’ primary contribution to the mission of TCS are in the areas of: managing school-wide discipline cases and conflict resolution, enculturating new and existing families into “The Cambridge Way,” developing leaders, providing leadership for the spiritual formation of the student body, giving oversight to TCS’ co-curricular programs, and assisting the Head of School, Jean Kim, in the strategic implantation of the school’s mission.

Russ’ passion for Classical Christian education was initially birthed over two decades ago at The Geneva School (TGS) in Orlando, Florida. Russ served with Bob Ingram for seven years at TGS teaching at the Logic and Rhetoric stages, coaching athletic teams, and leading training workshops for teachers.

Over the last 30 years Russ has served in several leadership posts in vocational ministry ranging from churches, parachurch ministries, and Christian Schools. Russ’ organizational leadership skills are visionary, strategic, pastoral and collaborative in nature. His competencies as an entrepreneur have enabled him to step into various Christian organizations for more than three decades and serve as a catalyst to launch new initiatives to advance the mission of those particular institutions.

Biblical Peacemaking
Establishing and maintaining a school culture where relationships can flourish is central to the mission of any Classical Christian school. Business management guru Peter Drucker once quipped, “culture eats strategy for breakfast.” The reality is that culture eats everything for breakfast. As soon as the culture of a school begins to wane it’s only a matter of time until the teacher, coach, and administrator labors in vain in the face of the toxic effects of a school culture gone awry. In light of this ongoing threat is the antidote of biblical peacemaking. Biblical peacemaking is at the heart of maintaining a culture that enables a school to flourish. Ultimately, our schools are in the business of human flourishing with a view to glorify God in all things, especially relationships. And, biblical peacemaking is about human flourishing applied to relationships. At the heart of a biblical peacemaking program requires a profound understanding of the gospel. Biblical peacemaking also requires that this amazing gospel be applied to all of our varied relationships within the school community. Thereby enabling our mission statements to become a reality by God’s grace. It is difficult to understate the importance of biblical peacemaking at our schools. In this workshop, we will look at the foundations of biblical peacemaking and its role in shaping school culture. We will also discuss practical ways to establish and maintain a culture.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 | Creekside I

Mission Possible Through Intentional Culture Work
Peter Greer and Chris Horst in their book entitled Mission Drift make the following observations,

Mission True culture doesn’t just happen. Thoughtful leaders intentionally craft the culture of their organizations and know it is too important to delegate…mission true organizations don’t underestimate culture. Cultivating a purposeful and healthy culture, reinforced by good habits, will carry forward your values and be another safeguard for your mission. Great organizations get culture.

In this workshop, we will examine best practices that proactively shape and guard school culture with a view to remain “on mission.” We will consider the role of a clear and applied mission statement along with the structures, systems, processes, policies, procedures, and people that are engaged from start to finish when assimilating new parents, students, faculty and staff into school culture. The goal: to protect school culture beginning with a person’s first encounter with your school, throughout the application process, and throughout the tenure of a student culminating in the portrait of the graduate.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 | Capitol G

Jean Kim

Jean Chung Kim has been an educator for more than 20 years, first as a high school history/humanities teacher, then as an educational policy analyst at a Washington DC think-tank, and then as the owner of a successful after school-tutoring center. She holds a BA in History from Yale University where she completed her teacher preparation as well. She serves on the board of The Society for Classical Learning, a national organization dedicated to helping Classical Christian schools flourish. Jean and her husband, Scott, have three children.

Starting and growing Classical Christian School
You will hear from three founding heads of schools from three locations, NYC, San Diego and Waco Texas. Collectively these three ladies have over 50 years of experiences running the schools. They will share why they started the school, the challenges of running the school as well as being female HOS/leaders and moms. The format will be a panel discussion style with plenty of times for Q/A.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | sideYard

Thomas Korcok

In 2001, Dr. Korcok developed Grace Evangelical Lutheran School in Pembroke, Ontario, and taught Logic to the upper grades. This initiated an interest that led to researching the application of the Liberal Arts in an elementary setting. He has taught at Concordia Lutheran Theological Seminary in St. Catharines, Ontario and Niagara University in Lewiston, New York. He currently is an Associate Professor of Theology at Concordia University Chicago where he has taught since 2013. At Concordia Dr. Korcok is the director of the Center for the Advancement of Lutheran Liberal Arts (CALLA) and director of the Classical Pedagogy program

What Were They Thinking?
When trying to explain Classical Education to others, we tend to focus on how our teaching style is more effective, how the content is beneficial for the student, and how it is superior to those commonly used in secular education. While those may be important measurements of Classical Education, we too often fail to realize that those who shaped the modern secular classroom had strong theological convictions that were contrary to the Christian faith. Some were Gnostics, others Mystics, and others Universalists. What they had in common was that they understood their pedagogies as tools to turn American children away from historic Christianity and adopt these anti-Christian theological views. This sectional will look at the theology of people such as Jean Piaget, Maria Montessori, and John Dewey, and how it has shaped the modern classroom. Practical approaches for explaining these concepts to parents will be explored.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | sideYARD

Glenn Lucke

I attended Dartmouth College, where I became a Christian via Cru’s campus ministry. I served on Cru staff for three years at Harvard, then worked for a church in Houston, before heading to RTS-O for an MDiv. I then earned my PhD in sociology at UVa, working with James Davison Hunter. While there I started Docent Research Group which I continue to run. I’m married to Stephanie and we helped start Austin Classical School, where our two sons attend.

The Secular Landscape: What It Looks Like, How We Got Here and How to Love Our Neighbors
Social forces shape culture not only at the level of conscious reflection, but also these forces sink into our marrow as dispositions and sensibilities. At the level of conscious reflection Americans contest rival stories that attempt to define reality, but at the level of dispositions and sensibilities the social forces have already done their shaping. We are “always already” formed by culture.

This workshop helps identify social forces like secularism, expressive individualism, pluralism, consumerism and the therapeutic which together form a potent cocktail. To shift the metaphor, these social forces together function like Drano, dissolving authority and commitment.

Secularity intensifies in our day among Americans generally. More citizens let slip their prior attachments to Christianity and other commitments. Christians, too, formed by these same social forces, find belief and practice harder in our secular age.

The workshop explores where we are, how we got here, and what loving our neighbors can look like as we seek counter-formation in the Kingdom and through classical Christian schooling.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Creekside II

Tom MacAdam

Tom MacAdam is a Consultant with The FOCUS Group. His expertise includes providing advancement counsel to nonprofits, major donor and planned gift development, and capital campaign counsel. Tom has served several classical Christian schools as they raise growth funding through capital campaigns.

For over 35 years, The FOCUS Group has helped nonprofits raise money more effectively through capital campaign counsel, major donor strategies, planned and estate gifts, and training. The firm currently serves seven classical Christian schools across the United States.

How to Develop and Grow Your Annual Fund
Many schools’ fundraising efforts involve a series of events that require a lot of effort relative to the funds they generate. Other schools raise money throughout the year for specific projects or needs but would be better off with a single, comprehensive annual fund.

If you’d like to build a sustainable and predictable annual fund, come learn a more strategic and relational approach that minimizes fatigue and maximizes results. Time will be available to discuss attendees’ specific questions.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Capitol H

Are You Ready for a Capital Campaign?
The Classical Christian Education movement is thriving, and many growing schools are ready to go to the next level by expanding their facilities or funding key initiatives. Join us to learn when it’s appropriate to launch a capital campaign and the key factors that will allow you to meet or exceed your goal. Time will be available to discuss attendees’ specific questions.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Capitol H

Louis Markos

Louis Markos holds a BA in English and History from Colgate University and an MA and PhD in English from the University of Michigan. He is a Professor of English and Scholar in Residence at Houston Baptist University, where he teaches courses on British Romantic and Victorian Poetry and Prose, the Classics, C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien, and Art and Film. Dr. Markos holds the Robert H. Ray Chair in Humanities and lectures on Ancient Greece and Rome, the Early Church and Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Romanticism for HBU’s Honors College. He is the author of eighteen books, including From Achilles to Christ, On the Shoulders of Hobbits, Literature: A Student’s Guide, CSL: An Apologist for Education, three Canon Press Worldview Guides to the Iliad, Odyssey, and Aeneid, & two children’s novels, The Dreaming Stone and In the Shadow of Troy, in which his kids become part of Greek Mythology and the Iliad and Odyssey. His son Alex teaches Latin at the Geneva School in Boerne, TX and his daughter Anastasia teaches music at Founders Classical Academy in Lewisville, TX.

Living in an Eschatological Universe: Virgil’s Aeneid and the Fall of Troy
It was Virgil—not in opposition to but alongside the Bible—who taught Christian Europe the shape of history and the power that moves it forward, the primacy of duty, the pain of letting go, and the burden of adapting new strategies. In this lecture, I will take the group scene by scene through Aeneid II, opening up the way in which Virgil presents the destruction of Troy as a happy fall (felix culpa): a great tragedy that provides the seed out of which greater good would come. Attendees are encouraged to bring with them a copy of the Fitzgerald translation of the Aeneid.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Capitol A-E

Hektor and Andromache: Balance in a World Gone Mad
In Book VI, Homer offers us a sort of Iliad in miniature: a self-contained narrative that carries the reader from war to peace, division to reconciliation, barbarism to civilization. In this lecture, I shall first set up the various tensions that underlie Book VI, and then zoom in for a close analysis of the farewell scene between Hektor and his wife, Andromache, a scene that embodies the universal, cross-cultural human need to find stability in the midst of chaos and meaning in the midst of existential despair. Attendees are encouraged to bring with them a copy of the Lattimore translation of the Iliad.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Capitol A-E

John Mays

After receiving his BS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University, John D. Mays spent 14 years in industry in engineering and engineering management in the areas of electrical, controls and telecommunications systems. Vocationally drawn toward the field of education, John acquired an MEd in Secondary Education from the University of Houston in 1989, and subsequently completed 36 hours of graduate study in Physics at Texas A&M. Shortly after joining the faculty at Regents School of Austin in 1999, John began work on an MLA at St. Edward’s University, which he completed in 2003. John served as the Math-Science Department Chair at Regents School from 2001 until 2009 when he became Director of the Laser Optics Lab at Regents. He founded Novare Science & Math in 2009, and is the author of numerous student science texts and teacher resources. Now working full time as writer, publisher and consultant, John continues to teach students part time at the Laser Optics Lab at Regents.

What Are Science Labs For?: Laboratory work as apprenticeship
Classroom teachers are very busy people. As a result, it is all too easy for us science teachers to regard laboratory experiments as activities to hustle through, check off the list, and be done with so we can get back to the regular lessons. But if our classes are to serve our students the way they should, we must not regard labs merely as something to check off a to-do list. Instead, the laboratory work in every science class should be treated as an apprenticeship. Apprentices learn their craft from masters, and the masters pass on a great deal of knowledge and skill that cannot effectively be learned from books or in classrooms. These skills must be learned by watching the a master (or perhaps a journeyman), imitating him under his critical eye, and practicing until the skill is mastered. From proper measurement techniques, to the sedulous care required to assemble apparatus, to proper laboratory documentation, if we treat our labs as apprenticeships that focus on transmission of specific skills, attitudes, and ways of thinking, our students experience—and our relationships with them—will be transformed.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Bickler

Jason Merritt

Dr. Jason Merritt is instructor of classical Greek and the senior thesis director at Covenant Classical School in Fort Worth, Texas. He has served classical schools in the Fort Worth Area for 12 years as both a teacher and headmaster. He has served as a translation consultant with Bible League International on Bible translation projects in Haitian Creole, Swahili, Japanese, and Croatian. He is the author of “Devils and Deviants: Religious Schism in 1st and 2nd John.”

Basics of Speaking Ancient Greek
Many classical educators have only limited exposure to the Greek language, and the different alphabet employed by Greek presents an impediment to further learning. This workshop seeks to bridge that gap by introducing the attendee to the Greek alphabet, pronunciation, and basic vocabulary through spoken exercises. This workshop is ideal both for lower and upper school teachers who deal with Greek history, culture, and literature in their curriculum and would like to explore the language further and incorporate basic elements of the alphabet and language into their instruction.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Bonnell

Christine Miller

Christine Miller joined the Geneva faculty in 2006 and teaches mathematics to dialectic and rhetoric students. Mrs. Miller received her BS in computer engineering from the University of Central Florida and worked as an engineer in the Central Florida area for seven years. In its inaugural year, Christine was the upper school winner of The Geneva School 2012 Paideia Award for excellence in teaching.

Conceptually-based upper school mathematics curriculum: Lessons learned from transition
Two years ago, our school transitioned to a conceptually-based, problem-solving focused mathematics curriculum for upper grades. We implemented Math in Focus for lower grades 8 years prior. This curriculum uses collaboration to foster learning and focuses on students making sense of mathematics for themselves. We will share lessons learned from the process including how parents responded, implementation challenges and obstacles, and success stories. Come learn from our experiences and see how you might make a similar transition within your school.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Barton

Steve Mittwede

Steve Mittwede serves as Science Department Chair at Covenant Classical School in Fort Worth. His academic journey began at The College of William and Mary in Virginia (BS in Geology), took him south to the University of South Carolina (MS and PhD in Geology) and Columbia International University (MA in Intercultural Studies and EdS in Educational Leadership), and took on an international flair when he studied at the Evangelical Theological College of Wales–now Union School of Theology (MTh in Modern Evangelical Theology). Steve and his bride make their home on the westernmost edge of Fort Worth, but relish opportunities to spend time with four sons and their burgeoning families. He does research and publishes every chance he gets, and is especially passionate about faith-learning integration.

That’s How We Stroll: Learning from Theophrastus
Although his work was done in the ancient, “pre-scientific” era, teachers have much to learn from the natural science of Theophrastus (c. 371~ 286 BC), Aristotle’s successor as scholarch of the Peripatetic school of philosophy in Athens beginning in ~322 BC. Theophrastus learned from the greats –Plato and Aristotle– and, accordingly, was a logical replacement for Aristotle as head of the Lyceum. According to Diogenes Laertius, the works of Theophrastus were voluminous (227 titles), ranging from scientific to mathematical, and from ethical to religious and philosophical works. Many of these works are lost, and others survive as fragments of the originals.

Providentially, some of the collected scientific thought of the Peripatetic school is extant in Theophrastus’ On Stones (1956 book prepared by Caley and Richards) and in his Enquiry into Plants (volumes in the Loeb Classical Library), and from these ancient mines precious pedagogical ore can be extracted.

How can we improve our serve with regard to science pedagogy? Theophrastus wonderfully models the following: close observation, copious description, varied experimentation, and careful classification. Moreover, he is eminently practical as he includes information regarding the known distribution and utilization of a wide variety of earth materials and plants. This workshop will survey the methodology of Theophrastus with emphasis on the value of outdoor learning.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | Bickler

Karen Moore

Karen Moore has filled both teaching and administrative roles at Grace Academy of Georgetown, a classical Christian school in central Texas, where she has built the 3-12th grade classical language program. She has nearly 20 years of experience teaching Latin, Greek, and Ancient Humanities in classical Christian schools. Karen also serves Grace Academy as the sponsor for their award-winning chapter of the Junior Classical League. She is the author of the Latin Alive Reader: Latin Literature from Cicero to Newton, multiple Latin texts and the Essential Latin Course for teachers on ClassicalU, all published through Classical Academic Press. Karen blogs on all things Latin at www.latinaliveonline.com. She and her husband Bryan are the proud parents of graduates of Grace Academy and one high school junior.

Hiding God’s Word in their Hearts: An Apologetic for Scripture Memory in the Upper School
Most of us would readily agree with the importance and even the necessity of memorizing some Scripture. This exercise seems to be emphasized particularly within the grammar school as our dear little sponges readily and eagerly soak up any data to be memorized from grammar chants to math facts to short poems, often using delightful ditties to ease the labor. However, the suggestion of asking older students to commit whole books of the Bible to memory might be considered daunting to say the least. Why? Truly the biggest obstacle may be that in this post-modern era we have no cultural precedent for such a discipline of memory. This is a discipline so far removed from what we have learned that our frame of reference feels inadequate. How can it be done? This presentation provides both an apologetic
for the memorization of large quantities of Scripture and a model for accomplishing these goals. Mrs. Moore will call upon examples from Scripture and educational models from the ancient Mediterranean world as she demonstrates what upper school students are presently accomplishing at Grace Academy. Ideally, this presentation can also be demonstrated with current GA Rhetoric students who would both recite and share their perspective on both the process and the fruit.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | sideYARD

The Art of Latin
The 12th and 13th century A.D. have been hailed as the Aetas Ovidiana for the great extent to which Ovid influenced the literature and art. The 8th and 9th century have similarly been dubbed the Aetas Vergiliana for the great influence of Vergil. Even today should you attend any of the excellent collections of Renaissance art, should a student of literature know the stories of Ovid, Vergil and the Bible that student would be able to well interpret the great majority of any piece that should capture his gaze. He would do well to consider, however, that the artists of such masterpieces were inspired not merely by the concept of a story, but the artful writing of Ovid and Vergil. This workshop will look at several masterpieces from these time periods as object lessons in the art of Latin. Such lessons integrate the study of Latin literature with art history enhancing the students’ understanding and appreciation of both studies. Such studies better equip our students and ourselves to grow as life-long learners and life-long lovers of both art and Latin.

This workshop will greatly benefit teachers of Latin, Art, and Ancient Literature.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Bonnell

Keith Nix

Keith Nix has served as the Head of School at Veritas School in Richmond, Virginia since 2010. Mr. Nix is the Vice Chairman of the Board of the Association of Classical and Christian Schools (ACCS) and President of the Board of Academic Advisors for the Classic Learning Initiatives (CLT), and was the prior Chairman of the Society for Classical Learning (SCL). Keith and his wife Kim have two grown sons, and a daughter in college. Keith enjoys tennis, golf, travel, and reading.

Building an Advisory Council that Strengthens and Advances Your Mission
Designed and developed properly, an Advisory Council can be a tremendous resource to help the Head of School (and Board) strengthen and grow the school. Through advocacy, advice, and investment, significant leverage can be gained through such a structure. In this seminar, we will discuss the make-up, structure, objectives and practices that could serve as a model or template for your school. You will also receive sample documents such as a purpose statement, commitment form, meeting agenda, and HOS report.

Friday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Capitol H

Staying Mission True
The natural tendency for any organization is to drift off course. It is the rule rather than the exception. So how do classical Christian schools become the exception rather than the rule? How do we stay true to our mission, even as we experience growth and success? In this seminar, we will look at indicators and warning signs for potential drift. Then we will explore principles and practices your school can embrace and employ to stay the course, and actually deepen your mission rather than drift from it.

Friday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Creekside II

Kurt Owen

Kurt has been teaching physics and mathematics for the past 27 years in private schools. The past five years of his career have been at The Wilberforce School, where he currently teaches physics, coding, and mathematics and runs the daily math support program. He has taught math courses spanning the spectrum from pre-algebra through calculus and has designed integrated mathematics and physics curricula.

Capturing the Beauty of Mathematics: Visualizing Mathematics Using Graphical Devices.
Our classical Christian schools are committed to the pursuit of truth, beauty and goodness, yet the beauty of mathematics is something that is seldom experienced by students. Mathematicians are able to look at algebraic expression and see them in their minds, but most students have yet to develop this ability. Graphing calculators as well as freely available graphing software are tools which help students to visualize mathematics. This approach serves students at every point on the spectrum. Those who quickly grasp algorithms are able to see the meaning behind their work, while those who struggle with algorithms are able to first see the big picture before wrestling with the details and are able to express understandings that often are not addressed in a class.

The workshop will look specifically at the following: Systems of equations presented as lines and planes, the visual meaning of quadratic solutions, constructing the centroid of a fluid a triangle, visualizing derivatives, and illustrating implicit equations.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Barton

Christopher Perrin

Christopher Perrin, PhD, is the CEO and publisher with Classical Academic Press, and a national leader, author, and speaker for the renewal of classical education. He serves as a consultant to classical Christian schools, classical charter schools, schools converting to the classical model, and homeschool co-ops. He is the director of the Alcuin Fellowship, former vice-chair of the Society for Classical Learning, and previously served as a classical school headmaster for ten years.

Piling It On: Why Classical Schools Have Too Many Periods and Teach Too Many Subjects
We all know that even classical school have inherited practices that derive from modern, progressive education. Slowly, we have been renewing the classical curriculum along with associated classical pedagogies and practices. We have learned that cultivating a warm culture of friendship and Christian love is fundamental to a classical education, and the soil in which the liberal arts curriculum and take root and flourish. As we continue to renew classical education, it is time we also look at the way we order and arrange the arts and subjects we teach. Is the eight period day the best way to arrange study and learning? Is teaching 10-12 subjects properly ordering education to the nature of the student and the goals we seek? C. S. Lewis clearly thinks not, when he advises that we should “teach far fewer subjects and teach them far better.” In this seminar, we shall explore the reasons why we have evolved the “wide curriculum” featuring eight periods and a dozen subjects and propose some healthy alternatives to it. We will also examine several schools that are already adopting such alternatives and the fruit they are enjoying.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Creekside II

The Seven Liberal Arts: Liberty and Justice for All
We have heard of the liberal arts—but can we name them? We live in a fuzzy moment in which even college professors at “liberal arts” colleges often cannot name the seven liberal arts, nor tell us precisely why they are called “liberal” and why they are called “arts.” In this seminar, we will name and describe the seven liberal arts (hint: they are contained in the trivium and quadrivium) and learn why they are all “liberating” arts that grant to men and women the capacity to be fully-human, fully-capacitated to do what only humans can do (hint: this much to do with mastering words and numbers). We will also note the ways that a liberally-educated person can become just and bring about meaningful justice in our world.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | Capitol A-E

Dan Peterson

Dan Peterson serves as Head of School at Regents School of Austin. Dan and his wife, Brooke, have four children: Isaac, Grace, Josie, and Annabelle. He enjoys reading, running, fly fishing, and playing soccer, but most of all spending time with his family. He received his B.A. in biology and human services from Carson-Newman University. He earned a M.Div. in theology from Southern Seminary and a Ph.D. in leadership with an emphasis in education from Southern Seminary. In 2017, he completed the Colson Fellows Program, a year-long intensive year led by The Colson Center for Christian Worldview. He served as the founding Headmaster at Cornerstone Academy, a classical Christian school in Tennessee for six years, the Head of School of Logic at Regents from 2012-2015, and the Head of School and President of Evangelical Christian School in Memphis, Tennessee, from 2015-2018 before returning to Regents.

Excellence Defined Biblically: Are We Half-Hearted Creatures?
God does not call classical Christian schools to be average or even good; God calls us to do everything with excellence. As a movement, classical Christian school educators and families seek to build schools that pursue excellence for the glory of God. If our aim is any less, then the Christian schooling model is a subpar education and not a supra education. In The Weight of Glory, C.S. Lewis challenges our thinking on whether we are “half-hearted creatures” “making mud pies in the slum” because we are unable to imagine when a “holiday at the sea” is offered to us. In day-to-day life, the word “excellence” can be thrown around to the point that it loses its meaning. It is easy to become, as Lewis notes, “far too easily pleased.” The aim of this article is to explore the question: How does one define excellence biblically?

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Capitol F

Vanessa Petty

Vanessa Petty is in her 5th year as the grammar school science specialist at the Geneva School of Boerne. She holds an education degree from Baylor University. She has a passion for classical and Christian education and God’s creation. She delights in emerging butterflies, erupting volcanoes and developing a sense of wonder in students.

Mens et Manus: Why Integration of Biblical Principles, Mathematics, and Science Matters
When we use our minds and our hands we glorify God (Mens et Manus). This session will address the compartmentalization of grammar school subjects by introducing math and science lessons that develop virtuous traits in students such as curiosity, tenacity, and fair-mindedness. This session will include ideas for holding students accountable for learned information. Fourth and fifth grade mathematics and science teachers and teacher leaders will be equipped with purposeful lessons integrating these content areas and a flowchart to help make curricular decisions at their own schools. Research-based learning theories will be cited for all lessons. Examples include How Far Apart are the Planets? And, Can we Turn a Paperclip into a Magnet?

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Capitol G

Mark Phillips

A graduate of Oxford University, UK, Dr. Phillips has a mission is to equip students with knowledge and application of scientific apologia, producing young men and women who know science without yielding to scientism. He holds degrees in both science and theology (B.S., Th.M., Ph.D., G.D.Th.). He became a believer through the science of cosmology and genetic informational systems while doing biomedical research at Vanderbilt University as an animal surgeon and analytical biochemist. He took a 2-year sabbatical from the lab for a comedy tour after winning the National Steve Martin Comedy Contest. He also has a background in ministry in the local church and as an educational missionary in Christian scientific apologetic presentations, including formal classroom education in secondary schools and seminaries in the UK, Africa, India, and Venezuela. Between semesters while studying at Oxford University in England, Dr. Phillip spoke at churches and the Oxford Union Debate Hall. After hearing one of his lectures, British IVP approached him to write an autobiography of his conversion to Christianity through the historic, textual, and scientific evidence. It was published in all the commonwealth nations. He recently completed a 3-part blog scientific apologetic blog series for The Master’s Seminary ( https://www.tms.edu/blog/ ).

Two Great Scientific Discoveries of the 20th Century That Matter to All of Us Part I & II
By the end of the 19th century, atheism was gaining strength through Darwinian thought and a belief in a static universe. By the end of the 20th century, these were significantly challenged by two great observational discoveries. Since then, the God of the Gaps has continued to shrink as Naturalism of the Gaps greatly increases with each new discovery in cosmology and biology. These two discoveries should be at least summarily taught to every secondary student, especially those in classical schools with the rhetorical skills to present this critical light to an unbelieving world indoctrinated by scientism (Over 80% of those who disbelieve the Bible say it is because they believe science disproves the Bible). A key practice in science is to defer to the best possible explanation for what is observed. Evidence for (1) universal origins and (2) programmed biological informational systems both demand that the best possible conclusion for what we learned in the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st is that a Designer Fine-Tuner Creator started it all and created all life. This presentation is a summary yet adequate teaching that gives the educator confidence to teach in these areas, equipping the next generation with important apologetic science.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Bickler
Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 3 | 4:00-5:00 PM | Bickler

Kristina Pierce

Kristina Pierce joined Providence Classical School’s faculty in 2009 and has taught in both the three-day and five-day kindergarten programs. She has degrees from Louisiana State University and Dallas Theological Seminary. She is certified in early childhood, special education (birth-21) and grammar K-5. Kristina has taught the early years and primary grades in many parts of the world including Louisiana, Tennessee, Texas, Singapore, Ireland, Scotland and England. She is passionate about the younger years and the opportunities that are available both classically and spiritually for this age group. Whether she is teaching the junior girls at church or serving as a children’s supervisor for Bible Study Fellowship, she encourages the current generation of millennials to rethink their parenting techniques and philosophies, as they consider what it means to love truth, beauty and goodness.

Classical Pre-K and Kindergarten: Structure or Senses
Classically, one might argue that pre grammar students learn best at home with their families than they do in a traditional classroom setting. The groundwork for a strong classical education can be successful by allowing children five and under plenty of free time, time reading quality literature, listening to classical music, cooking and learning about God. However, in today’s society both parents are working and little to no time is spent on heart training and partnering in their child’s education. How do we as teachers keep to the fundamentals of a classical education without surrendering to the culture? How do we use our classroom to engage the senses, train the hearts and do so without surrendering to the culture?

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | sideYARD

Brian Polk

Dr. Brian Polk has seventeen years of experience working at both the secondary and post-secondary levels, with ten of those years taking place at K-12 Classical Christian schools (The Geneva School in Winter Park Florida and presently at Regent Preparatory School of Oklahoma in Tulsa). In addition to teaching Chemistry, he has served in various administrative roles pertaining to both faculty and students and is currently a Dean of Students.

Dr. Polk earned his doctorate from Vanderbilt University in educational leadership with a research focus on the implementation and evaluation of professional development. Through his experience and training, he has come to believe strongly in the role that faculty play in high quality schooling. If a school is to have any chance of obtaining the lofty goals inherent in most Classical Christian mission statements, the faculty must be equipped and inspired – they must be provided opportunities and space to grow. Aside from hiring, high quality professional development is the only path available for administrators to improve their faculty and thus their school.

Professional Development that Works
How do we have professional development not be a waste of time? Brian Polk and Jim Reynolds will speak to 7 elements that, as they drive the design of professional development, make it increasingly effective. That is, this kind of professional development leads to lasting change in teacher practices that in turn leads to increased student learning—and flourishing. While this session is more about the process than the content of professional development, we will speak to the content we have used in our schools that, through this model, is leading to an ongoing transformation of classroom practices.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Creekside II

Shea Ramquist

Shea Ramquist is a native of Tokyo, Japan. He earned his bachelor’s degree in humanities after studying at Biola University’s Torrey Honors Institute and Oxford University. He then earned a master’s degree in intellectual history at the University of Notre Dame, specializing in the American classical college and the rise of the modern university. In 2015, he accepted a position in the Rhetoric School of Trinity Classical Academy in Santa Clarita, California, where he teaches honors courses in history, philosophy, and rhetoric, including senior thesis.

Recovering a Lost Tool of Rhetoric (Part II): Stasis Theory in the Writing Classroom
No rhetorical tool is perhaps more important to revive than stasis theory. Developed in ancient law courts, stasis theory offers immediate applications for the classical classroom. With stasis theory, students unlock three of the most difficult elements of persuasive writing: inventing ideas, generating claims, and structuring arguments. Most importantly, the theory trains students to position their argument at a point where they can make real progress. This session’s emphasis is practical, born out of years using the theory as a backbone for rhetoric classes. Attendees will learn how to incorporate stasis theory into writing classrooms, where it can be used to craft short on-demand essays, argumentative papers, and even a senior thesis. Note: This is the second part of a two part series on Stasis Theory, following Andrew Selby’s talk on its theoretical and historical background. You do not need to attend Selby’s talk to profit from this one.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | Creekside I

Valerie Rennie

Valerie Rennie is a kindergarten teacher at Trinity Academy in Raleigh, NC. She has a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a master’s degree in educational technology. She has taught grades K-3. When she isn’t with her favorite five-year-olds, she enjoys reading, listening to music, drinking coffee, and spending time with her family. Valerie is married to Jon and has two boys, one Trinity senior and one graduate.

The Lower School Morning Meeting: The Power of an Intentional Routine to Start the Day
“Discuss. Converse. Talk. Laugh. Go slow. Repeat.” – Christopher Perrin

Would you like to start each day in a positive way? Would you like your students to converse, listen, and reflect with one another? Would you like to establish a routine that each student looks forward to as they enter your classroom each morning? The morning meeting is a powerful approach to classical learning in the lower school as it allows for the integration of skills in multiple content areas, while setting the tone for the rest of the day. In this session, you will hear practical advice on how to incorporate a morning meeting into your daily schedule in addition to why this is an important way to start each morning. This session will demonstrate the importance of habit to set the tone and direct the path for learning. Participants will learn the significance of each element of the meeting and how this simple classroom method has cultivated deep friendships and community within the classroom.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | sideYARD

Jim Reynolds

Jim Reynolds is currently the Head of Lower School for the Veritas School in Richmond, VA. Previously, he was for 7 years the Dean of Faculty for The Geneva School in Winter Park, FL. Jim and his wife, Nancy, and their 3 boys moved to Florida in 2002 for Jim to become the Product Manager, Elementary Mathematics, for Harcourt School Publishers (now, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Jim transitioned from that position to become the Editor in Chief/Vice President of Elementary Mathematics. Before 2002, Jim was an Educational Consultant for Harcourt. He conducted training in private and public schools that had adopted Harcourt’s educational programs. Jim’s passion is to encourage and develop teachers—and improve school’s practices—so that students and teachers thrive.

Professional Development that Works
How do we have professional development not be a waste of time? Brian Polk and Jim Reynolds will speak to 7 elements that, as they drive the design of professional development, make it increasingly effective. That is, this kind of professional development leads to lasting change in teacher practices that in turn leads to increased student learning—and flourishing. While this session is more about the process than the content of professional development, we will speak to the content we have used in our schools that, through this model, is leading to an ongoing transformation of classroom practices.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Creekside II

Jim Reynolds

Jim Reynolds is currently the Head of Lower School for the Veritas School in Richmond, VA. Previously, he was for 7 years the Dean of Faculty for The Geneva School in Winter Park, FL. Jim and his wife, Nancy, and their 3 boys moved to Florida in 2002 for Jim to become the Product Manager, Elementary Mathematics, for Harcourt School Publishers (now, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Jim transitioned from that position to become the Editor in Chief/Vice President of Elementary Mathematics. Before 2002, Jim was an Educational Consultant for Harcourt. He conducted training in private and public schools that had adopted Harcourt’s educational programs. Jim’s passion is to encourage and develop teachers—and improve school’s practices—so that students and teachers thrive.

Professional Development that Works
How do we have professional development not be a waste of time? Brian Polk and Jim Reynolds will speak to 7 elements that, as they drive the design of professional development, make it increasingly effective. That is, this kind of professional development leads to lasting change in teacher practices that in turn leads to increased student learning—and flourishing. While this session is more about the process than the content of professional development, we will speak to the content we have used in our schools that, through this model, is leading to an ongoing transformation of classroom practices.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Creekside II

Hana Rodgers

Mrs. Hana Rodgers has a Master’s degree from the Czech Republic in English, Social Sciences, and Education. She loves sharing her love for God with her 3rd graders and is thankful for the opportunity to pursue the mission, vision and values of The Cambridge School in San Diego. Her excitement for the richness of the Christian classical education began in 2012 and has only deepened with time. She has had the privilege to grow in her art of teaching through attending conferences and training, but especially thanks to the help of her talented administrators and colleagues at The Cambridge School. She is grateful for the opportunity to point her students daily to the truth of God’s Word and to form the minds of her students. She is passionate about creating wonder and love of learning in her students and is always eager to improve in this area. She enjoys teaching her students about their Creator, diagramming, thinking of new ways to integrate the many subjects she gets to teach, creating history events to bring history to life for her students, helping her students understand and enjoy math, and much more.

Teaching Math Well When Time is Scarce
As lower grammar school teachers, we have to teach many subjects with a limited time to prepare for each of them. This seminar’s objective is to give you some tools for teaching math. Since most of us have to teach math every day, we run out of ideas quickly and do not always have the time to spend much time preparing for every single lesson. This seminar will offer ideas on how to teach the good, true, and beautiful in math as well as specific suggestions on how to integrate math with other subjects. However, you will be also leaving with several very practical tips – a list of warm-up activities, wise time activities, and easy ways to challenge your students.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Capitol G

Teaching the Greatest Book
Teaching God’s Word is a wonderful privilege as well as a great responsibility. Despite the fact that our specific theological views most likely differ, our commitment to teaching God’s Word faithfully and truthfully should be the same. Most of us have not attended a seminary or even a more rigorous training on how to teach the Bible, and yet we are expected to not only teach it, but to teach everything through a biblical worldview. If we want our students to respect God’s Word, we ourselves need to handle it with great care and respect. In this seminar, we will focus on what we have in common despite coming from different theological traditions. We will do our best to answer these important questions: How do we “rightly handle the word of truth” (2 Timothy 2:15) in our teaching the Bible to our students. How do we make learning God’s Word enjoyable? How do we give our grammar school students tools to build good Bible study habits and actually get to know God instead of just hearing about Him? How do we help them apply what they are learning? How do we integrate a biblical worldview into other subjects? And most importantly, how do we help our students love the Author of the greatest story?

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Capitol G

David Rosenberg

After graduating from the U. of California Santa Barbara with a degree in German Language and Literature, I discovered Classical Christian schooling and Harkness pedagogy at a start-up school in Santa Barbara. My commitment to this style of education eventually brought me to Regents School of Austin; I am halfway through my ninth year there and am now happy to serve the school as the Literature Chair. My lovely wife Misty and I have recently welcomed into the world our son Ian, and our daughter Sylvie will turn four in February.

The Spirit of Metaphor and Symbol
Beginning with the parables of Jesus and tracing the development of metaphor and symbol in Biblical texts, church tradition, and select literary works from medieval to modern, this workshop offers forth the hypothesis that the language of literature provides the most direct experience of spiritual reality this side of heaven. After establishing the theoretical background of the workshop, suggestions on how to craft lesson plans that teach students to appreciate the study of literature as an experience of the sacred will be provided; finally, a forum for shared ideas will be opened among the attendees of the workshop.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Barton

Paul Schaeffer

Paul Schaeffer is the Director of the School Division of Memoria Press and in that position has helped in numerous start-up schools. He is one of the few professionals working in classical education who received such an education himself. He has taught middle school, high school, and college-level Latin internationally. In Louisville, Kentucky, he led students through Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and other great works at Highlands Latin School. He is a regular contributor to The Classical Teacher magazine.

The Transition from the Grammar Stage to the Logic Stage
The classical education community is fascinated with Dorothy Sayers’ view of the Trivium. We will address whether it is proper to understand the Trivium as developmental stages, what grammar, logic, and rhetoric truly are, and how to best implement these ideas in a middle school classroom.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Barton

David Schenk

I teach philosophy at Messiah College, where I’ve been since 2006. I’ve been involved in the classical Christian education movement now since 2014 especially through the influence of Chris and Christine Perrin.

Teaching Philosophy: Abstraction and Argument in an Age of Distraction
A challenge in the liberal arts today is how to teach abstract and argumentatively dense material to students whose brains are habitually distracted and over-stimulated by social media and the digital age. “Argument” in social media today functions largely as a pugilistic exercise, not one of mutual reasoning for discovery of truth. Combatting this requires inventive means not just of holding our students’ attention, but also of bringing them to real understanding of issues about which current culture has become ignorant. Another challenge, of course, is helping students to see why some of these questions *matter*. I will discuss tactics I’ve developed for addressing these growing challenges but then also highlight several deeper challenges about which I continue to worry.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Bickler

Christopher Schlect

Christopher Schlect, PhD, has worked in classical and Christian education for over twenty-five years. He is the Director of the Classical and Christian Studies graduate program at New Saint Andrews College, where he also teaches courses in history and classical rhetoric. Schlect has also taught introductory and advanced courses in history at Washington State University, and has delivered many subjects to grades 7 through 12 at Logos School in Moscow, Idaho. Schlect serves Classical and Christian Schools around the country through his consulting and teacher training activities, and his published writings appear in various school curricula and other outlets. Schlect’s research in twentieth-century Protestant church life has earned numerous competitive grants and fellowships, and he has presented his research at meetings of the American Historical Association, the American Society of Church History, the American Academy of Religion and the Idaho Council for History Education. His historical experience also includes work as a ranger for the US National Park Service, where he specialized in Protestant missions to the Nez Perce people and interpreted historical sites and material culture for the public. Schlect is a teaching elder at Trinity Reformed Church (CREC) in Moscow, Idaho. He and his wife, Brenda, have five children, all products of a classical and Christian education. They also have three grandchildren.

Tools of Historical Reasoning
What are the tools of historical reasoning? Most curricular discussions revolve around what topics to cover, what information to deliver. Information is important, yet a classical approach to history is more concerned with forming the way our students reason about the past. Historical reasoning is an intellectual skill, a disciplined way of drawing inferences about the past. We want our graduates to go beyond us: to discover information that we did not supply to them, and to arrive at sound conclusions that we did not suggest to them. If our students will ever go beyond us, we must equip them to learn for themselves. What are these history skills? Do they appear in our curricular objectives?

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Creekside I

Andrew Selby

Andrew Selby has a passion for Classical Christian education. He wants to help teachers, administrators, and parents alike catch a vision for a tradition-resourced approach to helping our boys and girls grow to be mature men and women of God. He serves as Dean of Classical Instruction at Trinity Classical Academy where he also teaches medieval history, Bible, Latin and rhetoric classes. He has published articles in the areas of biblical interpretation, spiritual formation, church history, and systematic theology. He has a doctorate in religion focusing on early Christian theology from Baylor University, a master’s in theology from University of Toronto, and a bachelor’s from Biola University where he studied at the Torrey Honors Institute.

Recovering a Lost Tool of Rhetoric (Part I): Stasis Theory’s Essential Role in Rhetoric
If you teach rhetoric, you should teach stasis theory. In the classical tradition, teachers universally recognized that any fruitful disagreement begins by identifying the true controversy at hand. How often do important debates in politics, at school or at church devolve into the disputants hotly talking past one another? How often have we lamented when our students missed the point which needs to be addressed? The ancient Athenian could end up dead or property-less if he misidentified the controversy in court or found himself unprepared for his opponents’ arguments. To address these high stakes, ancient rhetoricians like Cicero, Quintilian, and Hermogenes developed stasis theory. Further refined by medieval and renaissance theorists, stasis theory lives within invention, the skill of applying fitting arguments to a relevant controversy. In this presentation, we will journey through the beginnings and development of stasis theory, learning what it is and how ancient students practiced it. Finally, we will become students ourselves, practicing stasis theory together using contemporary controversies.

Note: This is the first part of a two part series on stasis theory, followed by Shea Ramquist’s session, which will demonstrate the use and value of stasis theory in the contemporary classroom.

Friday, June 29 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Creekside I

Brandon Shufflebarger

After working in corporate finance, I seized the opportunity to join the Teach for America program where I taught Math for three years. I spent my first year teaching in the Mississippi Delta, where I led a group of Algebra students to the highest test scores in the district, and my last two years in inner-city Indianapolis. Eventually, I made my way to Regents School of Austin where I’ve taught various levels of Math and Economics. Currently, I’m building up the Computer Science program at Regents and working as an internal software developer.

Classical Considerations for Computer Programming
How should a classical school consider modern course offering such as Computer Programming? Should we focus on the Trivium and Quadrivium, hoping that we have formed students well enough for them to engage with technology responsibly? Or can Computer Programming act as a conduit through which we can engage students with the foundational principles of a classical education? This presentation will argue for the latter.

If the goal of rhetoric is to cultivate the good man speaking well, we must consider that there is a lot to say in the world of technology and students won’t have a voice if they can’t speak the language.

This presentation will be organized into two main points. We will make an argument for (1) why Computer Programming should be considered classical and (2) what benefits a classical school has to offer through teaching it (over and against similar course offered by STEM focused schools).

The presenters will draw on their experience from starting Computer Programming courses at Regents School of Austin and offer a second follow-up session in which they discuss the details of how to practically implement all of the concepts addressed in this talk to begin offering Computer Programming at your school.

Friday, June 29 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Barton

Brandon Shuman

Brandon serves as the Dean of Arts and Humanities at Midland Classical Academy deep in the heart of West Texas. Over the course of his ministry at MCA he has Socratically taught over 28 different junior high, high school, and parent courses from a wide range of academic disciplines including Great Books, Greek, Apologetics, History, and Movie Production. Brandon writes education articles for Midland’s local newspaper and co-hosts “The Good Knight Dad” podcast which encourages and empowers parents to better leverage their student’s experience at Midland Classical. Brandon enjoys coffee, fly fishing, playing baseball in the backyard with his two sons, singing to his newborn daughter, and adventuring through life alongside his beautiful wife, Laura.

Classical Education and Christian Discipleship Part 1: “Cultivating Virtue”
Concerning man, Aristotle wrote, “when perfected, is the noblest of all animals, but when separated from justice, he is the worst of all.” In part one we will contemplate the enterprise of Classical Education. We will consider how its Foundational Assumptions about Nature and Man; its Methodology of the Trivium; its Guiding Principles of Truth, Goodness, and Beauty; and its Telos for the Good Life – all intersect in the cultivation of virtuous men and society.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Capitol A-E

Classical Education and Christian Discipleship Part 2: “Re-Forming Men”
“The Gospel is to Classical Education as ___________________ is to ___________________.”

In part two we will consider the remarkable similarities and the complementary functions of Classical Education and Christian Discipleship, even as we draw important distinctions between them – the most important of which is that as disciple-makers, we are not seeking to sculpt better versions of Adam, but rather we are God’s instruments in His molding of young men and women into the brilliant image of Jesus.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Capitol A-E

Melissa Siller

Melissa Siller is a PhD candidate in Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She has spent the last 20 years in various areas of education, including assessment item writing, classroom teaching, teaching pre-service teachers in field based teacher education, and is currently in her 6th year as the reading specialist at the Geneva School of Boerne. In addition, she is an adjunct faculty member in Trinity University’s Department of Education. Her research focuses on teacher education, brain based teaching practices, curriculum and inquiry as well as beginning in-service teacher induction support.

The How of Reading Instruction in a Classical Education: The importance of a Systematic Approach to Early Literacy and Reading Achievement
Teacher preparation and knowledge are fundamental to reading achievement. In this session we will discuss why a systematic phonetic approach to reading instruction is classical, brain-based and effective. Understanding how the brain functions during the reading process and being knowledgeable of best practices is necessary for effective reading instruction. We will address the obstacles that get in the way of the reading process and how to come alongside struggling readers. Practical strategies for providing this necessary support in the Grammar School classroom will be shared. Participants will leave knowing how to apply their knowledge of reading development into effective instructional practices.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 2 | 2:45-3:45 PM | Capitol G

Joshua Simmons

A 13 year veteran of classical education, Josh serves currently as the Associate Head of the School of Rhetoric at Regents School of Austin. At Regents Josh has taught various history and literature courses, as well as Christian Apologetics and served as the Humanities Department Chair for 4 years. He is a frequent speaker on classical education at conferences and school in-services.

The Liberal Arts Tradition: An Introduction
This quick, high-level overview of classical education in Western history serves as a great introduction to the classical tradition or refresher for those looking to be reinvigorated in their passion for classical education. This talks has three parts: what are the liberal arts, the history of liberal arts education in 10 pictures, and the liberal arts tradition today.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | sideYARD

Herb Soles

Herb is a member of the ISM Fundraising Group, providing consulting services in the areas of development and fundraising. His expertise includes extensive knowledge of endowment and planned giving as a way to increase donors’ capacity to give at leadership levels. Herb delivers leadership coaching in major gift solicitation. He also provides Trustee, volunteer, and staff training for all facets of
fundraising activities.

In addition to serving as one of the planning architects for ISM’s weeklong summer Advancement Academy, he is an instructor and mentor in that program. He co-teaches ISM’s Summer Institute workshop on capital campaigns. He has earned the Leader (IAP-L) designation through ISM’s International Advancement Certification Program and is a Certified Fund Raising Executive.

Herb has coached advancement teams that have been recognized twice by the Council for the
Advancement and Support of Education in the Achievement in Mobilizing Support Award
competition. He has received seven other national awards for alumni participation, publication
improvement, and fundraising management.

Converting the Reluctant Solicitor into a Dynamic Fundraiser
“I will do anything but ask for money!”  How many times have we heard school leaders, both professional and volunteers, declare their aversion to fundraising.  In this very interactive session learn from a successful fundraising coach and trainer how to convert your most reluctant supporters into champion solicitors.  Discover proven techniques that will improve not only your volunteers’ ability “to ask” but your capability as well.  Whether you have a reluctant Head or staff member, a trustee or parent volunteer, it doesn’t matter.  Bring all your problems and we find solutions.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion, participants will be:

  • Better able to inspire, coach, and train volunteers and/or staff members to be dynamic fundraisers
  • More confident in individual roles as front line gift officers
  • Better able to maximize the capacity of the donor base
  • Prepared to help leadership make the best of their return on investment

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Capitol H

Creating and Writing a Foolproof Capital Campaign Plan
That great fund-raiser, Ben Franklin, once said, “If you fail to plan you are planning to fail.”  Creating a great written campaign strategy will help guarantee the future success of your school’s largest fundraising effort.  However, what goes into a foolproof plan? What are the ingredients? How do you put it all together so your volunteers and staff are all working in sync?  In this session, participants will even find out how to use a written plan to secure lead gifts. Join us and learn what a veteran capital campaigner has discovered as key secrets to reaching campaign goals and beyond.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  • Determine why a written campaign Is essential to success
  • Be able to develop a written organic strategy for future campaign success
  • Know three key components of major gift fundraising
  • Understand the anatomy of a capital campaign
  • Be informed of additional key documents
  • Understand the qualities and contents of the written plan
  • Have addressed final questions and concerns about their school’s campaign issues

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | Capitol H

Brynn Sowder

My name is Brynn Sowder and I am in my 5th year of teaching. This is my 4th year at Faith Christian School, a Christian classical school in Roanoke, Virginia. I worked for 1 year in the Junior Kindergarten program and am currently in my third year as a Kindergarten teacher. I graduated with a Masters in Teaching – Elementary Education from Mary Baldwin University in 2014. My graduate program heavily emphasized inquiry and how to make that the foundation of each class. I have attended ACCS and Circe National Conferences in order to deepen my understanding of classical education. In 2012 and 2018, I participated in Integrating Writing, Science and Art Through Nature Journaling with Mrs. Betty Gatewood of Mary Baldwin University. In 2016, I attended a weekend long workshop, Becoming a Curious Naturalist, with Clare Walker Leslie, one of the foremost experts and authors in the field of Nature Journaling. Over the last three years, I have integrated Nature Study in my Kindergarten classroom, in conjunction with Charlotte Mason’s model of Nature Study.

Nature Study: The Power of Inquiry and Observation
Even the youngest child is able to observe and inquire about the world surrounding them. Children are, as all grammar teachers know, masters at asking questions all day long. Nature is the God-given lens through which we can teach children to think critically, ask good questions, make keen observations, and marvel in awe and wonder at God, our Creator. Do not be deterred by the location of your school. Nature can be found if you only step out the door. As we seek to train the affections of our students to love things good, true and beautiful – what easier way to point our students to these things than through God’s gift of Creation. The skills of inquiry and observation that students can learn through Nature Study are indeed priceless. In the words of Charlotte Mason, “Consider, too, what an unequalled mental training the child-naturalist is getting for any study or calling under the sun – the powers of attention, of discrimination, of patient pursuit, growing his growth, what will they not fit him for (Mason,C.M. and Taylor-Hough, D., 2015)?” This talk will address why Nature Study should be integrated in the grammar school and how teachers can use Nature Study to encourage and improve inquiry and observation in their classrooms. We will walk through a mini Nature Study activity and follow with strategies and resources to bring Nature Study back to your classroom.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 6 | 9:30-10:30 AM | Bickler

Jeremy Tate

Jeremy Tate is founder and President of the Classic Learning Test (CLT). After graduating from Reformed Theological Seminary Jeremy started an SAT prep company while serving as the Director of College Counseling at a small Christian school. Since launching CLT in December of 2015 Jeremy has visited more than 100 colleges and secondary schools throughout the nation. Jeremy resides in Annapolis, Maryland with his wife and four kids.

The Impact of the Classical Renewal Movement on Higher Ed
The classical renewal movement has become a disruptive force in higher ed. Students who graduate from classical Christian schools stand out among their peers and become leaders on campus. Colleges are more eager than ever to find and recruit these students. The growing influence of the classical renewal movement comes with the responsibility of doing everything in our power to refocus colleges and universities on the timeless truths that were once the once foundation of academic inquiry.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | Creekside II

Haidee Thesing

Mrs. Haidee Thesing is a California Clear, multiple subject credentialed teacher with a BA from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and a Master’s degree in Education from San Jose State University. She taught with the Menlo Park City School District for 5 years where she was a Master Teacher. After moving back to her native San Diego several years ago, with her husband and growing family, she has been a classroom volunteer, substitute teacher and assistant teacher at a local private school. Mrs. Thesing is thrilled to be in her fifth year teaching First Grade at The Cambridge School. She is most passionate about training the next generation to love God with all their “heart, soul, mind and strength.”

Love and Logic overview
Looking for some practical strategies to use in the classroom to help students become more responsible, not only for their academic work, but also for solving conflicts with classmates? Ever have trouble coming up with consequences for student misbehavior on the spot? Are younger parents asking for help in training their children? Do you want faculty to come to school refreshed each day instead of burnt out with chronic discipline problems or classroom management challenges? These are questions we have faced at our school and have found helpful answers in Love and Logic parenting materials and teacher training materials. While not all of the strategies in this curriculum are appropriate for a classical Christian school setting, many of them have been helpful in training our faculty, and students, and providing a common language for students, parents, and faculty alike.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Capitol G

Christy Anne Vaughan

Dr. Christy Anne Vaughan earned her Ed.D from Liberty University in 2018. Her dissertation compared mean PSAT scores from Classical and Non-Classical Christian schools. She earned her master of Arts in Education, major in Special Education, from Georgetown College. She and her husband, David, founded Classical Christian Education International in 2014 as a mission to support start-up Classical Christian schools worldwide.

Evidence for Excellence
Results presented from a trailblazing quantitative study which compared mean scores on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) between Classical Christian schools and non-Classical Christian schools. The sample consisted of 4,486 mean scores from 2003-2004 through 2012-2013 and indicated Classical Christian methodology should have a large, positive effect on PSAT scores. Implications include improved teacher training in Classical methods as well as future research and associated correlational studies. Reprint of peer reviewed journal article included.

Saturday, June 29 | Breakout 7 | 10:45-11:45 AM | Creekside II

Miranda Webster

Hello! My husband and I live in Orillia, Ontario, Canada. I have been involved in classical Christian education since 2008. I have worked at Covenant Classical School in Fort Worth, TX; and currently, I teach seven sections with Veritas Scholars Academy, a classical Christian schools partnering with homeschool parents providing CCE to their students. In 2017, I started an Ed.D program at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. My dissertation is focused on racial diversity and classical Christian education.

Racial Diversity and Classical Christian Education
In The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation, Rod Dreher briefly comments about the relationship between classical Christian schools and the legacy of racism in the South. Classical Christian schools “would be wise to make special efforts toward racial reconciliation by recruiting black families, especially given that public schools are effectively resegregating.” His suggestion of “to make a special effort” raises a question: To what extent, are classical Christian schools “making any effort” towards racial reconciliation? If so, to what degree? Previous researchers of private schools found these institutions are primarily white. This information was gathered at the national level in the US, rather than looking specifically at classical Christian schools. With rising racial tensions and schools resegregating, classical Christian schools should explore ways to understand racial misunderstandings and methods to diversify and retain their curriculum, student body, faculty, and board of trustees.

Thursday, June 27 | Breakout 1 | 10:00-11:00 AM | Capitol F

Josh Wikerson

I graduated from Texas A&M in 2005 with a B.S. in Mathematics and I completed a Th.M. in Historical Theology from Dallas Theological Seminary in 2010. I have taught math at Regents School of Austin for the past seven years and completed my Ph.D. in Math Education from Texas State University in the spring of 2017. My dissertation focused on the benefits of service-learning projects in mathematics. This past year I took the position as the Mathematics Department Chair for the schools of rhetoric and logic at Regents. In my spare time I run the website www.GodandMath.com which is devoted to the integration of mathematics and Christian faith and I serve on the board for the Association of Christians in the Mathematical Sciences.

Classical Considerations for Computer Programming
How should a classical school consider modern course offering such as Computer Programming? Should we focus on the Trivium and Quadrivium, hoping that we have formed students well enough for them to engage with technology responsibly? Or can Computer Programming act as a conduit through which we can engage students with the foundational principles of a classical education? This presentation will argue for the latter.

If the goal of rhetoric is to cultivate the good man speaking well, we must consider that there is a lot to say in the world of technology and students won’t have a voice if they can’t speak the language.

This presentation will be organized into two main points. We will make an argument for (1) why Computer Programming should be considered classical and (2) what benefits a classical school has to offer through teaching it (over and against similar course offered by STEM focused schools).

The presenters will draw on their experience from starting Computer Programming courses at Regents School of Austin and offer a second follow-up session in which they discuss the details of how to practically implement all of the concepts addressed in this talk to begin offering Computer Programming at your school.

Friday, June 29 | Breakout 4 | 9:45-10:45 AM | Barton

Math is _____________
Many discussion of mathematics from a classical Christian perspective focus on presenting math as true, good, and beautiful. While this is undoubtedly an integral conversation to bring into the math classroom, if the conversation stops there, at true, good, and beautiful, then we are painting an incomplete picture of mathematics. If the conversation stops there then we are analyzing an abstract discipline with abstract language and many students leave our doors feeling as if they have had an intellectual conversation but they remain ultimately unchanged in how they practice and understand mathematics.

This presentation will challenge educators on how to complete the sentence “Math is ________ ” with language that remains faithful to the true, good, and beautiful but also considers the practical experience students are having of mathematics. How do we understand not only the philosophy of mathematics but the practice of mathematics from a Christian perspective? How do the practices and liturgies of the math classroom impact the mathematical affections of students?

This presentation will end by offering some practical examples that math teachers can implement in their own classroom.

Friday, June 28 | Breakout 5 | 2:15-3:15 PM | Barton