Explaining And Teaching Virtue to Baptized Skeptics

Session Description

Classical teachers face an uphill battle. Classical teachers help students cultivate virtue, but many Christians do not believe that cultivating virtue is important. Rather, many American Christians believe that gaining virtue is an unnecessary concern of delusional Christians who don’t understand salvation is by grace alone.

The Christian teacher needs both a philosophy which justifies teaching virtue, as well as habits and practices which employ that philosophy in a concrete, material manner. These lectures aim to give teachers a way of describing the cultivation of virtue in a manner which will make sense to nominal Christians who do not care about good works, or who view virtue as a nice-albeit-unnecessary aspect of Christianity. These lectures will also offer practical habits which teachers can bring to the classroom which reinforce the importance of virtue.

Schedule

8:00 am
8:30 am
9:00 am
9:30 am
10:00 am
10:30 am
11:00 am
11:30 am
12:00 pm
12:30 pm
1:00 pm
1:30 pm
2:00 pm
2:30 pm
3:00 pm
3:30 pm
4:00 pm
4:30 pm
5:00 pm
8:00 am
8:30 am
9:00 am
9:30 am
10:00 am
10:30 am
11:00 am
11:30 am
12:00 pm
12:30 pm
1:00 pm
1:30 pm
2:00 pm
2:30 pm
3:00 pm
3:30 pm
4:00 pm
4:30 pm
5:00 pm
Wednesday, June 27, 2018
Wednesday, June 27, 2018
Wednesday, June 27, 2018
Coffee & Meet and Greet
8:00 am - 8:15 am
Coffee & Meet and Greet

Session 1- Explaining Virtue to Nominal Christians: Can a classical education offer anything of value to a student who says, “I am saved, and so it doesn’t matter what I do. All that matters is what Christ has done”?
8:15 am - 9:15 am
Session 1- Explaining Virtue to Nominal Christians: Can a classical education offer anything of value to a student who says, “I am saved, and so it doesn’t matter what I do. All that matters is what Christ has done”?
8:15 am - 9:15 am

Session 2 - Explaining Virtue to People with Very Smart and Special Children: Can a classical education be of value to parents who believe their children are especially gifted? Are your children cursed with parents who praise them overmuch to their teachers or perfect strangers? How can you overcome this?
9:30 am - 10:30 am
Session 2 - Explaining Virtue to People with Very Smart and Special Children: Can a classical education be of value to parents who believe their children are especially gifted? Are your children cursed with parents who praise them overmuch to their teachers or perfect strangers? How can you overcome this?
9:30 am - 10:30 am

Session 3 - Teaching Virtue from Old Books: A crash course in conservative philosophy and how it relates to classical education.
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Session 3 - Teaching Virtue from Old Books: A crash course in conservative philosophy and how it relates to classical education.
10:45 am - 11:45 am

Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Session 4 - Teaching Old Things to New People: A host of habits consistent with the philosophical conservatism of Edmund Burke.
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Session 4 - Teaching Old Things to New People: A host of habits consistent with the philosophical conservatism of Edmund Burke.
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Session 5 - Teaching Virtue from Your Own Miserable Soul: How you, the chief of sinners, can teach virtue; how you can use all the terrible things you’ve done to teach virtue more effectively.
2:35 pm - 3:35 pm
Session 5 - Teaching Virtue from Your Own Miserable Soul: How you, the chief of sinners, can teach virtue; how you can use all the terrible things you’ve done to teach virtue more effectively.
2:35 pm - 3:35 pm

Session 6 - Pursuing Virtue in a Realm of Grace
3:40 pm - 4:40 pm
Session 6 - Pursuing Virtue in a Realm of Grace
3:40 pm - 4:40 pm

Guest Speaker: Andrew Smith If we're not careful, we Christian teachers will adhere to a false dichotomy between virtue and grace. To some, virtue sounds too much like works righteousness; to others, grace is a sanctified synonym for laziness or license. Those of us teaching in classical Christian schools have good reasons to reject both of these sentiments and must understand and teach our students how virtue and grace fit together.

Speaker Bio

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Joshua Gibbs is the editor of FilmFisher, a frequent contributor at the CiRCE Institute, and a teacher of great books at Veritas School in Richmond, Virginia. He has been labeled “insane” by two Pulitzer Prize winning poets and once abandoned a moving vehicle for fear of his life. He married a girl he fell in love with in high school and has two daughters, both of whom have seven names.

 

Andrew Smith is in his first year at Veritas, directing the Rhetoric curriculum and teaching Theology. He has been a teacher and administrator in Christian classical schools for 15 years. Prior to joining Veritas, he was Director of Upper School at The Geneva School, in Winter Park, Florida and before that, Head of Upper School at Westminster Academy, in Memphis, Tennessee. Andrew’s academic work has focused primarily on Rhetoric, both in curriculum development and in teacher training. From 2008-2010, he hosted the Memphis Rhetoric Symposium, and since then he has been a consultant and teacher trainer for several schools. Andrew has a B.A. in History from the University of Memphis, an M.Div. from Samford University, and an M.A. in Philosophy from the University of Memphis. He and his wife, Keri, have four children, spanning in age from 17 to 7.