Classical Pre-K And Kindergarten: Structure Or Senses

Kristina Pierce discusses how the Classical Pre-K and Kindergarten classrooms can engage the senses and train the hearts of the children.
math student

One might argue that pre-grammar students learn better at home with their families than they do in a classroom setting. Free time, reading quality literature, classical music, cooking and learning about God can provide the foundation for a strong classical education for these young children. In today’s families, however, it is increasingly common for both parents to work and for less time to be spent on heart-training and partnering in education. How do we, as teachers, keep to the fundamentals of a classical education without surrendering to the culture? How can our classrooms engage the senses and train hearts?

Kristina Pierce

Kristina joined Providence Classical School's faculty in 2009 and has taught in both the three-day and five-day Kindergarten programs. She has degrees from Louisiana State University and Dallas Theological Seminary. She is certified in early childhood, special education and grammar. Kristina has taught in many parts of the world, including Louisiana, Tennessee, Texas, Singapore, Ireland, Scotland and England. She is passionate about the younger years and the opportunities that are available both classically and spiritually for this age group. Whether she is teaching the junior girls at church or serving as a children's supervisor for Bible Study Fellowship, she encourages the current generation of millennials to rethink their parenting techniques and philosophies as they consider what it means to love truth, beauty and goodness.

Sign up for our Newsletter

Stay up to date with the latest SCL news, events, and resources!