That’s How We Stroll: Learning From Theophrastus

Steve Mittwede will survey Theophrastus' methodology with emphasis on the value of outdoor learning.

Although his work was done in the ancient, “pre-scientific” era, teachers today have much to learn from the natural science of Theophrastus, who learned from Plato and Aristotle and produced 227 works ranging from science, mathematics, ethics, religion and philosophy. Many of these works are lost, and others survive only as fragments of the originals. From these ancient mines, precious pedagogical ore can be extracted. How can we improve our serve with regard to science pedagogy? Theophrastus wonderfully models the following: close observation, copious description, varied experimentation and careful classification. Moreover, he includes information regarding the known distribution and utilization of a wide variety of materials and plants. This workshop will survey his methodology with emphasis on the value of outdoor learning.

Steve Mittwede

Steve serves as the Chair of the Science Department at Covenant Classical School in Fort Worth, Texas. He has a bachelor's degree in geology from Th e College of William and Mary in Virginia; master's and doctoral degrees in geology from Th e University of South Carolina; a master's degree in intercultural studies and an educational specialist degree from Columbia International University; and a master's degree in modern evangelical theology from Union School of Theology in Wales. Steve and his bride live in Fort Worth, but relish opportunities to spend time with their four sons and their families. He publishes research every chance he gets, and is especially passionate about faith-learning integration.

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