Rejecting the Magician’s Bargain

Ken Myers argues that modern science is not the outcome of a Christian worldview.

In The Abolition of Man, C. S. Lewis argued that the project of modern science “was born in an unhealthy neighbourhood and at an inauspicious hour. Its triumphs may have been too rapid and purchased at too high a price: reconsideration, and something like repentance, may be required.” While there have been some scientists, philosophers, and theologians who have thoughtfully reconsidered the foundations of modern science, many Christians assume that modern science is the innocent offspring of a purely Christian worldview. Ken Myers explains why that’s not an accurate account, and explores what repentance might look like.

Ken Myers

Ken Myers is the host and producer of the MARS HILL AUDIO Journal, a bimonthly audio magazine that examines issues in contemporary culture from a framework shaped by Christian conviction. He was formerly the editor of This World: A Journal of Religion and Public Life, a quarterly journal whose editor-in-chief was Richard John Neuhaus. Prior to his tenure at This World, he was executive editor of Eternity magazine. For eight years, he was a producer and editor for National Public Radio, working for much of that time as arts and humanities editor for the two news programs, Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Mr. Myers serves as an advisory editor for Christianity Today, and his published writings include All God’s Children and Blue Suede Shoes: Christians and Popular Culture (Crossway Books: 1989), and (as editor) Aspiring to Freedom: Commentaries on John Paul II’s Encyclical “The Social Concerns of the Church” (William B. Eerdmans: 1988). He has also wri en for numerous periodicals. He has served on the Arts on Radio and Television Panel for the National Endowment for the Arts, and he lectures frequently at colleges, universities, and churches around the country. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland, where he studied lm theory and criticism, and of Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. He and his wife Kate have a large garden, a cat, a dog, two children, and they live in the country, north of Charlottesville, Virginia.

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