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Voting for Nazis: Cultivating Empathy in the Secondary History Classroom

Teaching European history to 15- and 16-year-olds presents dual challenges. One must get students genuinely invested in events of the past before getting them to empathize with people and situations they perceive as different from themselves. There are two significant barriers that must be overcome: lack of humility and possession of too much information. Without […]

Using Primary Sources to Teach History at the Grammar Stage

Many teachers at the Grammar stage feel intimidated by teaching history and wonder if there is a way to make it more interesting. Introducing primary sources into your history curriculum will help your students understand and engage history in deep and meaningful ways. Participants will learn how to add flavor to their history curriculum using […]

Guide and Warning From America’s Classical Education Past: The Yale Report of 1828

In the early 19th century, Yale College stood as the last, great bastion of Classical education in the United States. Buffeted by demands for “useful learning” and scathing critiques of “dead languages,” the Yale faculty produced an eloquent apology for Classical education, the famed Yale Report of 1828. This document provided an aegis for the […]

Developing a Safe, Curriculum-Centered Europe Trip – Josh Simmons

As classical educators, we love our ideals and ideas, but there’s something magical about seeing students interact with the “concrete” reality of places studied in literature and history. European school trips can incarnate the ideas presented in the classroom, and so serve as a  key part of any school’s curriculum. Nothing makes the French Revolution […]

Benefits & Principles of Integrative Teaching

One of the fundamental insights of classical education is that knowledge is unified, and yet the way many of us teach treats subjects like history and literature as though they are distinct by separating them into two different classes. Whether you teach these classes separately or you teach Humanities in one “block”, it is possible […]

Did Rome fall? And other historical questions that we need to ask but seldom do.

Historical “facts” do not speak for themselves. They have meaning only when we place them into a narrative frame. As Christian educators we need to teach our history students to interrogate the historical narratives that frame our conceptions (and misconceptions) of the past: Was there a Renaissance? The Middle Ages occurred in the middle of […]

Humane Letters: An Approach to Integrating History and Literature Instruction

In this pedagogical workshop, veteran humanities teacher Rick Trumbo will explain how the Veritas School Humane Letters: Antiquity course combines history, literature, and writing instruction in a single, double period course. He will include illustrations and ideas from his Ancient Humanities text. Teachers will also share ideas, practices, and questions they have about interdisciplinary teaching. […]

Classical Dante: Rome and the Two Kingdoms

In Paradiso 6 Justinian expounds the Roman Empire’s divine mission and the state’s role as God’s servant. These ideas, found in Comedy and Monarchia, anticipate the Two Kingdoms of Luther and Calvin and the American separation of church and state.