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Guide and Warning From America’s Classical Education Past: The Yale Report of 1828

In the early 19th century, Yale College stood as the last, great bastion of Classical education in the United States. Buffeted by demands for “useful learning” and scathing critiques of “dead languages,” the Yale faculty produced an eloquent apology for Classical education, the famed Yale Report of 1828. This document provided an aegis for the […]

The Enchanted Cosmos: Mathematics Among the Liberal Arts

This session will introduce a curriculum and pedagogy for mathematics grounded in the Classical Christian tradition. It will give special attention to 7th through 12th Grades (or pre-algebra through calculus), though many topics will be of interest to K-6 teachers. This classical approach, which is under active development for release through Classical Academic Press, will […]

Singapore Math Strategies: An In-Depth Look (w/Susy Willetts)

What does a Singapore Math classroom look like and sound like? Throughout this in-depth session, we will demonstrate effective Singapore instructional strategies, including questioning, mathematical discussions and writing in the math journal. You will view student samples and experience the importance of inquiry through the anchor tasks. Come join the conversation and learn this approach […]

Asking the Right Questions: Categories of Study and Thought for Mathematics

All too often, math is taught as a set of irrelevant, isolated algorithms. In this workshop, we will explore how to combat this and learn how to teach math in alignment with Classical thought by asking better questions. We will practice and use specific categories of inquiry about a mathematical concept, such as historical context, […]

Connecting Grammar School Mathematics to High School Algebra

Do you ever wonder why we teach specific representations in Grammar School? Do you wonder how you can connect your high school algebra curriculum to Grammar School mathematical knowledge? Come explore how areas of Grammar School mathematics connect to high school mathematics. We will explore multiplication, specifically, and will examine the connection between the early […]

Teaching Geometry through Euclid’s Elements

Euclid’s Elements is the most successful and influential mathematics textbooks ever written, served as the foundation of mathematical understanding for students for over two millennia, and stands as one of the greatest and most beautiful achievements of the human intellect produced by Western civilization. While it’s obvious that the Elements ought to stand at the […]

Mathematics in the Liberal Arts Tradition

While today math teachers often struggle to convince their students of the usefulness of the discipline, the tradition famously advocated the study of mathematics for a completely different reason. The ancients and Medieval believed the study of mathematics to play a crucial role in developing wisdom and the faculty of human reason in students. But […]

Cultivating Mathematical Affections through Service-Learning

This seminar will focus on the integration of service-learning projects in the mathematics curriculum as a means of cultivating mathematical affections in students-developing a habitual inclination to view mathematics as a worthwhile endeavor. This seminar will equip participants to design, implement, and evaluate service-learning projects in which students partner with nonprofit organizations. Through these projects, […]

Teaching Arithmetic Classically

In this session we will challenge popularized notions of the “grammar of mathematics” as well as critique the prominence of “rote memorization’ in our grammar school instruction. Then we will explore an alternative approach to teaching arithmetic, moving from the concrete to the pictorial to the abstract in a way that honors the structure of […]