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Annual Conference Breakout Sessions

Breakout Sessions

  • Rethinking Grades: When is an A not an A? | Janet Andreasen
  • Implementing Charlotte Mason’s Practice of Narration in the Classical Classroom | Jason Barney
  • Head of School | Peter Baur
  • Clarity is King… A process to develop a clear, easily implemented definition of Christian classical education for your school. | Peter Baur
  • Dyslexia at Your Door | Allison Buras
  • Moral Philosophy as Capstone Experience | Todd Buras
  • Partnering with Parents | Robyn Burlew
  • Music is Core, Especially in Small Schools | Wade Butin
  • Memory in the Grammar Stage | Leslie Collins
  • Should Your High School Teach AP Math and Science Courses? | Christian Corley
  • The Medieval Quaestio Format: A Valuable M ethod of Inquiry for Classical Schools Today | David Diener
  • Dewey’s Experience & Education: A (Partial) Defense | David Diener
  • The Art of Rhetoric in the Light of Christ | Phillip Donnelly
  • Just the Math Facts; Not the Anxiety | Cristina Dube
  • Creating a Classical Aesthetic | Paula Dwyer
  • Classical Christian Education for All – New Schools for Low-Income Communities | Russ Gregg
  • Teaching Latin Vocabulary Well | Timothy Griffith
  • New Parent Orientation | Rim Hinckley
  • One Art to Rule Them All | Andrew Kern
  • Rhetoric Divine, Rhetoric Diabolical | Andrew Kern
  • Building a High-Performance Leadership Team | Jean Kim
  • “A Long Obedience in the Same Direction”- Reflections on Endurance & Leadership | Dusty Kinslow
  • How to Escape the Fundraising Treadmill | Brad Layland
  • The Seven Keys to Success for Capital Campaigns | Brad Layland
  • Sexual Abuse in Education — How to Prevent the Problem | Greg Love
  • Greek Myths and Gospel Truths | Alex Markos
  • All Things Vile and Vicious: Seeing God’s Glory in the Horrors of Nature | Jeffrey Mays
  • Raising Sturdy Kids – Part 1 | Keith McCurdy
  • Raising Sturdy Kids – Part 2 | Keith McCurdy
  • How to Manage Embodied Beings in a Grammar Classroom | Athena Oden
  • Lessons Learned: What We Have Learned After 40 Years of Renewing Classical Christian Education in America | Christopher Perrin
  • Slimming Down the Curriculum: How to Follow the Advice of C.S. Lewis to Teach Fewer Subjects Far Better | Christopher Perrin
  • Story-based Learning in Early Classical Education | Kristina Pierce
  • Connecting the Dots – The Practice of Oral Narration in the Lower School | Valerie Rennie
  • The Lower School Morning Meeting: The Power of an Intentional Routine to Start the Day | Valerie Rennie
  • Reflections on Teaching Science Classically (Part 1) | Jim Reynolds
  • Reflections on Teaching Science Classically (Part 2) | Jim Reynolds
  • Effective Classroom Discussion | Christopher Schlect
  • Olive Branches & Sawdust | Lisa Schreiber
  • The Classical Apprenticeship: Mastering the Art of Teaching | David Seibel
  • Teaching History as a Literature of Human Action | Bryan Smith
  • Why We Teach Languages, How Languages Impact Learners, and What We Can Measure in Learners? | Lisa Snyder
  • School of Rhetoric in Name Only | James Tallmon
  • Strength in Diversity | Peter Vandebrake
  • Developing a Student Support Program: Part 1 | Leslie Collins
  • Developing a Student Support Program: Part 2 | Leslie Collins

***New Panel Discussions***
Panels are an engaging way to hear from a group of subject matter experts on a particular topic. This more conversational format lends itself to a presentation that is more informal, yet personal and practical.  The panels are run by a facilitator who will welcome and present your ideas, making these workshops especially effective at answering the questions that are top of mind. LEARN MORE

***New Interactive/ Problem Solving Workgroups***
If you have been to other SCL events you have likely seen these workgroups in action. They get some of the most positive feedback from the conferences each year. This is your opportunity to bring a specific problem or challenge that you are facing as an administrator or teacher.  Any topic from curriculum to fundraising to marketing may be presented.  Each table will have one presenter and four to five group members who are there to help problem solve using a proven, systematic approach that will be lead by the moderator in the room. The best part is regardless of whether you are presenting, you will walk away with good practical ideas and likely some new friends from your time around the table!