Demystifying Classical Music Curriculum

Most parents agree that they would love for their children
to be trained in music and to be familiar with great musical works from the past. However, it is easy to be lost when trying to create a rich music curriculum. Because of infuences from public school programs and popular perceptions about the “extracurricular” nature of music, the study of music can easily be pushed aside in favor of more familiar subjects. However, everything around us is a symbol and refection of God’s goodness. It is vital that students make the connection between art and the beauty of God. For this reason, music is absolutely essential to the education of a child and needs to remain in the forefront of school curriculum.

Michael Attaway

Michael started his trumpet studies at the age of 11 and has performed with some of the world’s nest musicians, including Doc Severinsen, Amy Grant, Michael W. Smith, Kenny G and Mannheim Steamroller. Michael mentors trumpet students and is an adjunct faculty member at Tarrant County College, where he teaches music fundamentals and history. He also teaches music at the Covenant School in Dallas. He is the third trumpet with the Richardson Symphony Orchestra, and performs with ensembles around the Dallas/Fort Worth area.

Crafting a Classical Music Curriculum

Lilli Benko, music teacher/administrator and violinist at Veritas School in Richmond, VA, will share the story of her growing school’s developing music program and the successes and ongoing challenges. Her presentation will include a teaching demonstration of the “Paper Orchestra” and her blueprints for a distinctively “classical” and integrated K-12 curriculum. All are welcome, especially arts educators and administrators.

Lilli Benko

With a B.A. in Music and Rhetoric/Communication Studies from the University of Virginia, Lilli received her formative training in violin with Ronda Respess (Atlanta Symphony), participated in summer festivals at the Brevard School of Music and Indiana University School of Music, and served as concertmaster and first violinist for various youth orchestras and quartets. She actively performs in Richmond area chamber ensembles, theater orchestras and is a member of her worship team at West End Presbyterian Church. Lilli is living her ‘dream day job’ as a Director of Arts Education which enables her to teach and design music curriculum at Veritas in Richmond, Virginia. ”I am thrilled to work alongside an immensely talented and dedicated faculty in cultivating students’ a ections for God’s glory through the fine and performing arts.” Lilli relishes the daily adventure and joys of shepherding Win (13) and Tad (6) alongside her husband, Ma .

Building a Classically-Based Orchestra and Music Program

This seminar will discuss ways to start and develop a successful ensemble (band or orchestra) in a private school setting as well as avoiding common pitfalls.

Sterling Archer

B. Sterling Archer is the orchestra director at Regents School of Austin. He has bachelors of Music Education from Wheaton College (Music Conservatory). A varied musician, he has played in symphony orchestras, toured the country with rock bands, and won awards as a singer/ songwriter. He has taught music in public schools, international schools, and started the Regents band and orchestra programs 10 years ago. As of 2014, Regents now has 5th grade beginning band and orchestra, 6th grade band and orchestra, SOL band and orchestra, SOR Concert Band, SOR Intermezzo Orchestra, SOR Honor Orchestra, SOR Symphonic Ensemble, SOR Jazz Band, and SOR Knights Pep Band (as well as other percussion ensembles, a drumline, quartets/chamber groups). In the spring of 2014, the Regents Band & Orchestra program ranked 2nd in the state of Texas (TAPPS State Music Competition).

Training the Affections: Inviting Students to Love Great Music

As modern American culture trends towards shorter (and flashier) media presentations, our society-including the church- is at risk of losing the common language of the great works in music and the fine arts. Our children are increasingly less familiar with the beauty of music and lack of attention skills and knowledge to understand the seminal works of Bach through 20th century Jazz. Classical education is the ideal environment to nurture young apprentices in the art of listening and, ultimately, to become creators of new material to glorify God. In this seminar, we will explore creative and practical ways to train students to discern artistry and become lovers and advocates of great music and the fine arts.

Lilli Benko

With a B.A. in Music and Rhetoric/Communication Studies from the University of Virginia, Lilli received her formative training in violin with Ronda Respess (Atlanta Symphony), participated in summer festivals at the Brevard School of Music and Indiana University School of Music, and served as concertmaster and first violinist for various youth orchestras and quartets. She actively performs in Richmond area chamber ensembles, theater orchestras and is a member of her worship team at West End Presbyterian Church. Lilli is living her ‘dream day job’ as a Director of Arts Education which enables her to teach and design music curriculum at Veritas in Richmond, Virginia. ”I am thrilled to work alongside an immensely talented and dedicated faculty in cultivating students’ a ections for God’s glory through the fine and performing arts.” Lilli relishes the daily adventure and joys of shepherding Win (13) and Tad (6) alongside her husband, Ma .

The Beauty of Teaching Music Classically

Ms. Love explains how to encourage all ages of students to hear, understand, and personalize great works. She outlines how to provide the necessary historic, scientific, and thematic context before listening to a piece. Ms. Love demonstrates how to use recognition and “the art of music naming”. In addition, Ms. Love guides educators to see that Jesus is woven throughout all creation and that educators must “keep him in the conversation” as they teach. Ms. Love encourages educators to consider that God created music “good” and that He made us able to understand, appreciate, and create music for His glory alone.

Nancy Love

Nancy Love has a BS from Bemidji State University, MN in Music and Elementary Education. She taught elementary music in public schools in North Dakota and Minnesota before she took a missionary position as a music educator at Rift Valley School in Kenya, East Africa. During her 20 years at the boarding school for children of missionaries. Ms, Love created and developed the elementary music program, an elementary choral program, wrote curriculum for general music classes, and directed a variety of performances. Ms. Love also worked briefly in the Seychelles, Islands in the Indian Ocean, organizing, creating and developing national grammar school choral ensembles for the Seychellois government under the auspices of the Conservatoire of Seychelles. Since 2004, Ms. Love has been a lower school music educator at Hill Country Christian School of Austin where she has worked with teachers to develop a music program that is integrated with classroom studies.