Is Chemistry Classical?

This seminar will begin with a review of the relationship between the contemporary sciences and the role of the classical Seven Liberal Arts in classical and Christian schools. From there we will take a colorful and fascinating look at some ways chemistry allows us to explore truth, goodness and beauty.

John Mays

John D. Mays has logged 16 years teaching in high schools and colleges in a teaching career that dates back to 1985. A er receiving his BS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University, Mr. Mays spent 14 years in industry in engineering and engineering management. Vocationally drawn toward education, Mr. Mays completed an MEd in Secondary Education from the University of Houston in 1989, and subsequently completed 36 hours of graduate study in Physics at Texas A&M. He joined the faculty at Regents School of Austin in 1999 and completed an MLA at St. Edward’s University in 2003. Mr. Mays served as the Math-Science Department Chair at Regents School from 2001 until 2009 when he became Director of the Laser Optics Lab at Regents. He founded Novare Science and Math in 2009, and is the author of The Student Lab Report Handbook (2009), Teaching Science so that Students Learn Science (2010), and Accelerated Studies in Physics and Chemistry: A Mastery-Oriented Introductory Curriculum (2012). He continues to teach physics and mathematics at Regents School of Austin and to develop the Laser Optics Lab there.

What Makes Math Different?

What are the features of mathematics classes at a classical and Christian school that distinguish them from math classes at other schools? Should history figure in? (If so, how can integration of history be done effectively?) What about writing or oral expression? (Ditto.) How about the classical pursuit of truth, goodness and beauty? And most importantly, how should our studies in mathematics point to the Kingdom reign of Jesus Christ? This seminar will address all of these questions and more. Several important books and You Tube videos will also be discussed as resources CCE teachers should know about and utilize.

John Mays

John D. Mays has logged 16 years teaching in high schools and colleges in a teaching career that dates back to 1985. A er receiving his BS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University, Mr. Mays spent 14 years in industry in engineering and engineering management. Vocationally drawn toward education, Mr. Mays completed an MEd in Secondary Education from the University of Houston in 1989, and subsequently completed 36 hours of graduate study in Physics at Texas A&M. He joined the faculty at Regents School of Austin in 1999 and completed an MLA at St. Edward’s University in 2003. Mr. Mays served as the Math-Science Department Chair at Regents School from 2001 until 2009 when he became Director of the Laser Optics Lab at Regents. He founded Novare Science and Math in 2009, and is the author of The Student Lab Report Handbook (2009), Teaching Science so that Students Learn Science (2010), and Accelerated Studies in Physics and Chemistry: A Mastery-Oriented Introductory Curriculum (2012). He continues to teach physics and mathematics at Regents School of Austin and to develop the Laser Optics Lab there.

Guidelines for Realizing Biblical Faithfulness in Science and Math

Science classes at classical and Christian schools should embody key distinctives that differentiate them from typical classes at other schools. The same holds true for math classes. One of these distinctives is biblical faithfulness. In this seminar the presenter will argue that simply starting class with prayer or a Bible reading, or acknowledging God as the Creator in posters on the walls of the classroom are not adequate as attempts to realize biblical faithfulness in science and math. Also inadequate are the simplistic answers often given by Christian schools to contemporary hot-button science issues. Instead, classical and Christian schools need a vision for realizing biblical faithfulness that is rooted in the classical intellectual tradition, and conversant in biblical attitudes toward nature, work, study and God’s intimate governance of His Creation/ Only then can we model loving God with ‘all our mind’ for our students.

John Mays

After receiving his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University, John spent 14 years working in engineering before acquiring a master's degree in education from the University of Houston. Shortly aft er joining the faculty at Regents School of Austin, John completed his master's degree in liberal arts at St. Edward's University. John served as the Chair of the Math-Science Department until 2009, when he became Director of the Laser Optics Lab. He founded Novare Science & Math in 2009, and is the author of numerous science texts and teacher resources. Now working full-time as a writer, publisher and consultant, John continues to teach students part-time at Regents.

Better Physics Experiments: Cheap, Fun and Solid

While laboratory experiments in biology routinely capture students’ imaginations, traditional workbook experiments in physics can be very frustrating. Equipment tends to work poorly, equipment costs can be high, students have a hard time understanding the artificial equipment, and students often are not enthusiastic about the dreary experiments. In this workshop we will review a number of novel experiments that do not use traditional physics lab apparatus. These activities are fun and memorable, generally inexpensive and are technically rigorous. Experiments appropriate for students in both ninth and twelfth grade will be presented.

John Mays

After receiving his BS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University, John spent 14 years in industry in engineering and engineering management. Being vocationally drawn toward the field of education, he completed an MEd in Secondary Education form the University of Houston in 1989, and subsequently completed 36 hours of graduate study in Physics at Texas A&M. Shortly after joining the faculty at Regents School of Austin in 1999, Mr. Mays began work on a MLA at St. Edward's University, which he completed in 2003. Mr Mays served as the Math-Science Department Chair at Regents School from 2001 until 2009 and is the author of Teaching Science so that Students Learn Science, and The Student Lab Report Handbook. He continues to teach physics and mathematics at Regents School of Austin and to develop the Laser Optics Lab there.