Teaching Writing Slowly

Rhetoric is the art of decision-making in community. As a liberating art, many smaller skills culminate in this faculty of truth perception. Teachers often cultivate this art through writing. How can our students slow down to think before they write? Writing demands attention and consistency, much like learning to play the piano or shoot a bow. The finnal artifact is infused by the initial inventory of ideas. Classical rhetoric offers the canon of invention, and teachers can utilize these tools to guide discussions, launch written responses and pursue unidentified truths. By using these tools, students will have thoughtful responses modeled for them each day.

Matt Bianco

Matt is the Director of Consulting and Integrated Resources for the CiRCE Institute, where he also serves as a mentor in the apprenticeship program. A homeschooling father of three, he has already graduated two sons. The eldest son attends St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, and his second son attends Belmont Abbey College in Charlotte, North Carolina. His daughter is a high school senior. He is married to his altogether lovely, high school sweetheart, Patty. Matt is the author of Letters to My Sons: A Humane Vision for Human Relationships.

Educating Philosopher Kings

In Plato’s Republic, Socrates sets forth the curriculum
for educating children to be future philosopher kings, the kind of people who can know truth, control their passions and lead others to truth. Join us to walk through the curriculum, consider its strengths and weaknesses, and consider how it might be implemented in our lives and in our classrooms. We’ll discover how we can learn — even from an ancient Greek philosopher – how to worship God and love Him with all of our minds.

Matt Bianco

Matt Bianco is the Director of The Lost Tools of Writing for the CiRCE Institute, where he also serves as a mentor in the CiRCE apprenticeship program. A homeschooling father of three, he has already graduated two sons. The eldest son attends St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland, and his second son attends Belmont Abbey College in Charlotte, North Carolina. His youngest, a daughter, is a high school senior. He is married to his altogether lovely, high school sweetheart, Patty. He is the author of Letters to My Sons: A Humane Vision for Human Relationships.

Students are People Too

Assuming students are lazy, disinterested, and rebellious are among the easiest assumptions teachers can make. Where we would excuse our own behavior because of a lack of sleep, food, or other comforts, we do not for our students. If the Good Life is to live up to our fullest human potential, how much of that is found in our honoring the Imago Dei in others, in our students? What does it mean to treat students as humans, and don’t we just automatically do that already? In many cases, no. The way we educate can be seen through six dimensions: environment, community, governance, pedagogy, curriculum, and assessment. Each of these are dimensions in which, seen rightly, can help teachers, administrators, and schools honor the humanity of their leaders, their teachers, their faculty, and, most importantly, their students.

Matt Bianco

Ma Bianco is the Director of The Lost Tools of Writing for the CiRCE Institute, where he also serves as a mentor in the CiRCE apprenticeship program. A homeschooling father of three, he graduated his oldest two sons, the eldest of which is a ending St. John’s College in Annapolis, MD. His second child is a ending Belmont Abbey College in Charlo e, NC, and his youngest (and only daughter) is a high school junior. He is married to his altogether lovely, high school sweetheart, Patty. He is the author of Letters to My Sons: A Humane Vision for Human Relationships.

Recovering the Humanity of Rhetoric

Rhetoric is more than just winning arguments or persuading opponents. It is the act of bringing two minds into harmony; it is the act of harmonizing a community. Rhetoric and its canons, Invention, Arrangement, Elocution, Memory, and Delivery, are themselves designed to harmonize. They are, moreover, designed to honor the humanity of our audience, our community, our conversation partner. Recovering the humanity of rhetoric means seeing and teaching the canons in such a way as to promote the humanity of the other. These tools, already designed to honor the humanity of the other, get abused when rhetoric is reduced to winning an argument or mere persuasion. Let us recover the humanity of rhetoric; let us teach our students to honor those who disagree with them.

Matt Bianco

Ma Bianco is the Director of The Lost Tools of Writing for the CiRCE Institute, where he also serves as a mentor in the CiRCE apprenticeship program. A homeschooling father of three, he graduated his oldest two sons, the eldest of which is a ending St. John’s College in Annapolis, MD. His second child is a ending Belmont Abbey College in Charlo e, NC, and his youngest (and only daughter) is a high school junior. He is married to his altogether lovely, high school sweetheart, Patty. He is the author of Letters to My Sons: A Humane Vision for Human Relationships.