John Mays examines a wide variety of ways in which the heavens declare God’s glory to us, including anthropic implications in contemporary science that have been responsible for driving some notable atheists to faith.
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Christians have always affirmed this testimony from Psalm 19. But the breadth of the revelation of God’s glory in nature is far wider than we often appreciate. In this seminar we will examine a wide variety of ways in which the heavens declare God’s glory to us, including anthropic implications in contemporary science that have been responsible for driving some notable atheists to faith. We will also examine the implications of our role as God’s image bearers on the question of God’s revelation in the book of His Works—Nature.

John Mays

After receiving his BS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University, John D. Mays spent 14 years in industry in engineering and engineering management in the areas of electrical, controls and telecommunications systems. Vocationally drawn toward the eld of education, John acquired an MEd in Secondary Education from the University of Houston in 1989, and subsequently completed 36 hours of graduate study in Physics at Texas A&M. Shortly a er joining the faculty at Regents School of Austin in 1999, John began work on an MLA at St. Edward’s University, which he completed in 2003. John served as the Math-Science Department Chair at Regents School from 2001 until 2009 when he became Director of the Laser Optics Lab at Regents. He founded Novare Science and Math in 2009, and is the author of numerous student science texts and teacher resources. Now working full time as writer, publisher and consultant, John continues to teach students part time at the Laser Optics Lab at Regents.