Why We Have Issues: Why Classical Christian Schools Should Have Strong Journalism Departments

Becky Ryden discusses the importance of journalism.

We teach a lot of Rhetoric in classical schools, and put it to good use through writing and thesis presentations. However, there is an argument to be made for using those same skills to produce a Rhetoric School publication for and by the student body. These publications benefit the school and the student. In this session, the basics of starting a Journalism program are presented to help a school get on the way to producing a publication of its own. Whether you are exhibiting art and writing in a literary magazine, or jumping into the fray of modern journalism, this class can teach students how to lead, work on a team and produce something for which they and their school can be proud.

Becky Ryden

I graduated from Baylor University with a degree in English and Journalism. A erward, I traveled the runway circuit working for Neiman Marcus as a shoe buyer for many years while producing o spring and raising them. I started a Journalism program at the Covenant School in Dallas and then again at Geneva School of Boerne. I have taught Language Arts at Geneva for the past seven years emphasizing great literature, poetry, and Shakespeare. For the past eight years, I have also formed a Journalism program that produced a quarterly news magazine and an annual literary magazine. Our publications have won top awards from the Texas University Interscholastic League, National Scholastic Press Association, and Columbia Scholastic Press Association. We were the recipients of the Crown Award this year with CSPA; a notable award. I am also the mother of four children: Alex, who is a ending medical school in San Antonio (UTHSC); Ethan, who is a sophomore at UT Austin studying Architecture; Audrey, who is a junior at Geneva; and our youngest daughter Eliot, who is in sixth grade at Geneva.

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