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Dorothy Sayers Was Wrong About the Art of Grammar

Dorothy Sayers famously wrote that Grammar is the “poll parrot” stage in which younger students memorize many facts. In her influential and often valuable essay, The Lost Tools of Learning, she asserts that she is replicating the medieval understanding of the trivium. We’ll explore the perspective that Sayers’ definition of the art of grammar actually […]

Art Through the Humanities

In a strong Classical education, it can be difficult to find the time and place for a rigorous focus on the arts. Many classical schools seek to integrate their subjects, weaving content between the disciplines. Although we celebrate a rich history of integrating subjects in order to address and train the whole intellect, teaching the […]

The Enchanted Cosmos: Mathematics Among the Liberal Arts

This session will introduce a curriculum and pedagogy for mathematics grounded in the Classical Christian tradition. It will give special attention to 7th through 12th Grades (or pre-algebra through calculus), though many topics will be of interest to K-6 teachers. This classical approach, which is under active development for release through Classical Academic Press, will […]

A Practical Introduction to the Liberal Arts

As the tools and seeds of learning, the liberal arts of language and math have important implications for teaching and learning in the classical classroom. This session introduces the basic logic of liberal arts teaching through concrete examples.

Mathematics in the Liberal Arts Tradition

While today math teachers often struggle to convince their students of the usefulness of the discipline, the tradition famously advocated the study of mathematics for a completely different reason. The ancients and Medieval believed the study of mathematics to play a crucial role in developing wisdom and the faculty of human reason in students. But […]

The Teacher as Curriculum Part 2

One of the pitfalls of modern education has been the centrality of methodology and the corresponding technical specializations of the educator. Instead of being encouraged to learn how to learn or to love a particular discipline, professionalized teachers have been trained to manage people and schedules and to disseminate information according to standardized system. In […]

The Teacher as Curriculum Part 1

One of the pitfalls of modern education has been the centrality of methodology and the corresponding technical specializations of the educator. Instead of being encouraged to learn how to learn or to love a particular discipline, professionalized teachers have been trained to manage people and schedules and to disseminate information according to standardized system. In […]

The Liberal Arts as a Model, not a Modification

The Christian, classical school renewal movement does not consist of one-size-fits-all method and curriculum. Rather, it is filled with excellent, timeless, and effective practices and purposes for engaging in education. While these practices and purposes manifest themselves in varying and nuanced ways from school to school, they share two things in common: 1) they are […]

Leading For The Common Good

Based upon my research of 550 interviews with American CEOs, senior government leaders, and nonprofit executives, this talk explores how a liberal arts approach to leadership helps develop leaders for the common good.